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Makiki man’s experience prompts push to change warrantless search protocols

Glen Murray said he had a funny feeling when he returned to his unit at the Kulaokahua Apartments in Makiki last November.
Published: Apr. 15, 2022 at 5:36 PM HST|Updated: Apr. 22, 2022 at 3:08 PM HST
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HONOLULU (HawaiiNewsNow) - Glen Murray said he had a funny feeling when he returned to his unit at the Kulaokahua Apartments in Makiki last November.

“I found my door unlocked and I was surprised that I forgot to lock it,” Murray said.

He was worried someone had gone in. But it wasn’t until weeks later that he found out, it was Honolulu police officers.

“I asked our resident manager to access our video camera surveillance and she was able to obtain footage of two uniformed HPD officers enter my unit,” he said.

A worker at the apartment unlocked the door for the officers. That made Murray fear he was being accused of a crime.

“It created a lot of stress,” he said.

So he set to work trying to find out why HPD was in his apartment.

Two months later, he was told that the officers were doing a welfare check.

But the person they were checking on has not lived in that complex for more than two years.

Neither police nor the person at the complex who unlocked the door notified Murray.

The incident prompted Honolulu Councilman Augie Tulba to draft a resolution that was approved Wednesday. “This resolution acknowledges that there are lawful circumstances where HPD needs to exercise their authority to search someone’s home or property without warrant,” Tulba said.

“It is simply asking that HPD create a policy or process whereby they can give property owners information about a warrantless search that took place.”

Hawaii News Now did reach out to HPD to find out if they would adopt such a policy for these circumstances, but did not respond on the holiday.

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