Radford High School eases transition for new students - Hawaii News Now - KGMB and KHNL

Radford High School eases transition for new students

HONOLULU (HawaiiNewsNow) -

At Radford High School, a game that looks a lot like Jeopardy is part of a program meant to ease the stress of being the new kids on campus.

"It's nice having other students that are willing to help you get introduced to the school," senior Preston Olson said.

Olson is a student facilitator in the school's Transition Center.

Sixty percent of Radford's students are children of military members. Every school year kids transfer out and transfer in. Adrienne Perry is one of the new ones.

"It's my senior year. I had all my friends and I was comfortable at the place I was. To have to uproot and start all over was kind of intimidating," she said.

Student facilitators teach new students about Radford's rules, campus life and Hawaii's culture.

"As of right now for this school year we have transitioned 203 new students from our very first day of the school year," Transition Center coordinator Cindy Schrock said.

That's how it is every year. Principal James Sunday said the revolving door is always open.

"We have kids coming in as late as May, seniors enrolling here at Radford," he said.

There are no stats to prove it, but logic says feeling at home removes one roadblock to learning.

"I believe that students always need to feel safe before they can learn and learn well," Schrock said.

Radford's transition program has been going since 1995. It's helped thousands of students.

"The feeling for me was unbelievable. It can't be put into words," Perry said.

Student facilitators don't get any extra credit, just a lot of self-satisfaction.

"The smiling faces I get to see when I get to say hi to all the new students, there's no comparison," Olson said.

Radford's peer-to-peer system was modeled after a school in Alaska. But there teachers are in charge. At Radford, students run the show.

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