Their mission is to save lives, but these days this museum is trying to save itself

Founded in response to the deadly Hilo tsunami of 1960, the Pacific Tsunami Museum has spent the last 30 years educating communities across the world.
Published: Nov. 20, 2023 at 5:30 PM HST|Updated: Nov. 20, 2023 at 5:50 PM HST
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HONOLULU (HawaiiNewsNow) - Founded in response to the deadly Hilo tsunami of 1960, the Pacific Tsunami Museum has spent the last 30 years educating communities across the state and around the world. It’s also memorial to the victims of the Hilo disaster and a tragic reminder of how destructive tsunamis can be.

Now museum leadership is asking for help to continue its work.

The facility has fallen into a major state of disrepair with a number of issues, including no air conditioning, a leaking roof, and mold treatment, which has already cost thousands to remediate.

Museum official Walter Dudley says a full repair of the building would cost as much a $200,000, but any bit would be greatly appreciated.

“We’re the only museum in the United States whose mission is to save lives and Hilo is the most affected community in the entire united states that’s had the greatest death toll from previous tsunamis,” Dudley said.

“It is a critical part of our community and we definitely need to continue with our mission to not forget those lost ... to share the amazing stories we have of survivors and then to save lives through education.”

Dudley also adds that every year that goes by without a tsunami, the odds of another tsunami increase —underscoring the importance of continuing education.

Those interested in helping can click here.