Hokulea and Hikianalia see favorable ocean conditions on their voyage to Tahiti

After waiting out some weather delays before leaving Hilo, Hokulea and Hikianalia are making excellent progress on their journey to Tahiti.
Published: Apr. 22, 2022 at 3:42 PM HST|Updated: Apr. 22, 2022 at 5:57 PM HST
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HONOLULU (HawaiiNewsNow) - After waiting out some weather delays before leaving Hilo, Hokulea and Hikianalia are making excellent progress on their journey to Tahiti.

Hawaii News Now caught up with the crew recently for an update on the Kealaikahiki voyage.

As of sunrise Friday, the canoes are about 525 miles south of Hilo. They are approaching the equator and about three-and-a-half to four days away from the Doldrums region.

Hokulea captain Lehua Kamalu says they are in a good spot right now and their biggest test thus far has been moving through Hawaiian waters.

“The conditions within the channels of Hawaii are arguably some of the most challenging sailing conditions we encounter,” Kamalu said.

“Certainly for me, some of my most difficult sails and training journeys were right there in the Kaiwi channel and the Alenuihaha, so just getting our canoes to the point of departure can be sort of half the battle.”

While still too early to project, the canoes could reach Tahiti as early as May 4, based on their current speed and forecast.

“While conditions probably do seem a little bit rough here on the water, they’re actually really perfect for us,” Kamalu said.

“The wind is kind of in a favorable direction that kind of opens up this pathway to Tahiti for us. So once we are able to get away from the islands and into this nice clean open ocean weather, it’s been really perfect everyday.”

Kealaikahiki is a training voyage for next year’s Moananuiakea expedition, which is an expansive journey around the Pacific Ocean.

Those interested in tracking the Kealaikahiki voyage can click here.

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