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Ivermectin does not prevent COVID-19 hospitalization, study finds

A recent study found that ivermectin does not reduce the risk of COVID hospitalizations.
A recent study found that ivermectin does not reduce the risk of COVID hospitalizations.(KWCH)
Published: Mar. 31, 2022 at 9:44 AM HST
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(Gray News) - A recent study conducted in Brazil found that ivermectin, a medication used to treat certain parasitic infections, didn’t reduce the risk of hospitalization from COVID-19.

The study was published Wednesday in the New England Journal of Medicine after researchers in Brazil studied more than 1,300 patients, half of which received ivermectin and the other half a placebo.

There were no significant differences between the ivermectin and placebo groups concerning viral clearance at day seven, according to the study. And there were no significant differences between the groups in the risk of hospitalization or clinical recovery.

Researchers wrote they did not find a significant or clinically lower risk of medical admission to a hospital or prolonged emergency department observation with ivermectin administered for three days than with the placebo.

Upon conclusion of the study, researchers found that ivermectin did not result in a lower incidence of medical admission to a hospital or prolonged emergency department observation for COVID among outpatients at high risk for serious illness.

Ivermectin has been the topic of several discussions and other trials throughout the pandemic regarding coronavirus treatment.

The Associated Press reported that Australian researchers published a study in June 2020 that found ivermectin inhibited the replication of SARS-CoV-2 in a laboratory setting. But that was not the same as testing the drug on humans or animals.

Following that Australian study, the FDA released a letter out of concern warning consumers not to self-medicate with ivermectin products intended for animals.

“If there is one thing we have learned in the pandemic is that we cannot jump the gun as far as determining or making assumptions about the effectiveness of potential agents,” said Dr. Nasia Safdar, medical director of infection prevention at the University of Wisconsin-Madison Hospital.

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