‘These are all preventable’: After spate of traffic fatalities, first responders urge road safety

Honolulu first responders are raising the alarm after a spate of traffic fatalities so far this year.
Published: Mar. 3, 2022 at 2:29 PM HST|Updated: Mar. 3, 2022 at 5:26 PM HST
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HONOLULU (HawaiiNewsNow) - Honolulu first responders are raising the alarm after a spate of traffic fatalities so far this year.

Since January, Oahu has seen 14 traffic fatalities. Of those, four have been pedestrians.

That compares to nine fatalities at the same time last year and nine at this time in 2019.

“It’s ridiculous that we’re still talking about this,” said HPD Traffic Lt. James Slayter. “As a community, we’re allowing this to happen. Put the phone away. Focus on the road.”

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Over the last two weeks alone, Oahu has seen seven traffic fatalities. They include a mother and daughter killed when a speeding car plowed into their parked vehicle.

The driver in the crash was arrested for negligent homicide and DUI.

Honolulu first responders are raising the alarm after a spate of traffic fatalities so far this year.

Slayter said the end of COVID restrictions and a return to pre-pandemic traffic levels could be contributing to the rise in traffic fatalities.

He noted that many of the crashes involve impairment, including alcohol.

“That’s something we have to really try and fix as as community. Because I think as a community we’re allowing this to happen,” Slayter said. “In today’s day and age there are so many rideshare companies out there. It’s nearly impossible to not be able to find a way to get home safely.”

Slayter also urged drivers and pedestrians to:

  • Pay attention while on the road.
  • Follow traffic and speeding laws.
  • Get a designated driver.
  • Be defensive and pay attention to where you’re going.

He also said pedestrians should wear bright clothing at night and don’t assume that a driver sees you.

“These are all preventable,” Slayter said. “As a community, we need to stop desensitizing these collisions.”

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