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Volunteers envision a day where it’s safe to fish in these polluted waters

Chance and a few others began the work in 2018 and recruited people to help in the effort. Each year thousands volunteer for the community project.
Published: Oct. 25, 2021 at 4:07 PM HST|Updated: Oct. 25, 2021 at 4:27 PM HST
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HONOLULU (HawaiiNewsNow) - At Kapapapuhi Point Park in Ewa Beach, a rebirth is happening.

Gone are mountains of thick mangroves that hid the fishponds that once thrived there. “Now we’re seeing exactly what it’s supposed to be like, getting the wetlands back,” Anthony Chance said.

The retired Navy Seabee runs the non-profit Hui O Ho’ohonua or HOH808 for short. It’s on a mission to clean up Honouliuli Stream and the West Loch coastline.

Chance envisions a day when it’s safe to fish in the waters.

“There’s signs all over Pearl Harbor that say ‘Do not eat’ by the Department of Health because of certain toxins and it’s pollution. We want to be able to take those signs down,” he said.

Chance and a few others began the work in 2018 and recruited people to help in the effort. Each year thousands volunteer for the community project.

“It’s the first time in 25 years we have seen water here in this fishpond,” he said.

The park is about 29 acres. The fishponds make up a third of them.

“I’m learning as well about the importance of the fishponds, and we have fishpond practitioners that we look to as our experts and that guide us on our journey,” Chance said.

He’s trying to raise money to expand the work and speed up the cleanup, and the non-profit needs more volunteers.

“I may not see this in my lifetime, but we have to develop the importance for it now,” he said.

The next big cleanup day at the park is Nov. 13.

If you want to help, contact the non-profit through its website.

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