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‘Bows open Clarence T.C. Ching Athletics Complex with win over Portland State

The University of Hawaii Rainbow Warriors football team christened their new home turf with a...
The University of Hawaii Rainbow Warriors football team christened their new home turf with a 49-35 win over Portland State on Saturday.(Hawaii News Now)
Published: Sep. 4, 2021 at 11:00 PM HST
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HONOLULU (HawaiiNewsNow) - The University of Hawaii Rainbow Warriors football team christened their new home turf with a 49-35 win over Portland State on Saturday.

After a tough loss to UCLA to open the season, UH came back strong in their first game on campus ever at the newly renovated Clarence T.C. Ching Athletics Complex.

Hawaii was able to start the game fast, scoring on their opening drive with a 23-yard pass from Chevan Cordeiro to Nick Mardner.

In the ‘Bows next series, Calvin Turner Jr. would reverse field to tack on another touchdown early in the first quarter.

The offense would go on to score two more times in the first quarter alone, thanks to big stops on defense like an interception by defensive lineman Pita Tonga.

The Vikings would finally find pay dirt early in the second quarter, but Hawaii would continue to pour on the points with a redzone touchdown pass to Aaron Cephus to give UH the 35-7 lead at halftime.

Saturday was a tale of two halfs, as the Viks came out firing, looking to spoil Hawaii’s inaugural home game — scoring 28 points in the second half.

With the 49 points, this is the most points scored in the Todd Graham era, however the offense gave up three turnovers.

Hawaii’s Chevan Cordeiro finished the game completing 18 of his 25 passes for 305 yards, three touchdowns and an interception.

On the other side of the ball, Justus Tavai and Kai Kaneshiro led the ‘Bows with six tackles each.

UH heads back to the mainland next week to face their second Pac-12 opponent in Oregon State — kickoff is set for 5:00 p.m. HST on FS1.

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