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Gas prices jump 13 cents since Memorial Day weekend, show little signs of relief

FILE - In this Thursday, July 1, 2021, file photo, the gasoline prices are displayed on a sign...
FILE - In this Thursday, July 1, 2021, file photo, the gasoline prices are displayed on a sign as motorists head east along a frontage road parallel to Interstate 70 to get an early start on the Fourth of July holiday weekend near Golden, Colo. Drivers are facing pricier fill-ups as more people hit the road for work, travel and other activities that the virus pandemic halted.(David Zalubowski | AP)
Published: Jul. 20, 2021 at 5:15 AM HST
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(Gray News/AP) - Drivers are facing pricier fill-ups as more people hit the road for work, travel and other activities that the virus pandemic halted.

Gas prices have increased an average of 13 cents across the country since Memorial Day weekend.

That is 98 cents more than a year ago, according to AAA, but still 41 cents cheaper than this time in July 2014, the last time the national average was above $3 per gallon.

This is a national gas comparison for the past four years.
This is a national gas comparison for the past four years.(AAA)

Despite potentially lower crude oil prices in August, AAA still expects the price at the pump to be high throughout the summer.

“It’s a cruel summer at the gas pump with prices showing little signs of relief,” AAA spokesperson Jeanette McGee said in a news release.

The prices are especially painful for drivers who just a year ago saw average gas prices fall to their lowest point since 2016 but couldn’t go far because of the virus pandemic.

“However, the more expensive prices aren’t stopping motorists from filling up based on strong gasoline demand numbers,” McGee said.

The supply and demand disconnect is being exacerbated by a busier summer travel season.

According to AAA, the nation’s top 10 largest weekly increases include:

  • Ohio (+11 cents)
  • Michigan (+10 cents)
  • Utah (+10 cents)
  • Nevada (+8 cents)
  • Kansas (+8 cents)
  • Idaho (+7 cents)
  • Illinois (+6 cents)
  • Wisconsin (+5 cents)
  • Wyoming (+5 cents)
  • North Dakota (+5 cents)

According to AAA, the nation’s top 10 least expensive markets include:

  • Mississippi ($2.78)
  • Louisiana ($2.81)
  • Alabama ($2.83)
  • Texas ($2.83)
  • Missouri ($2.84)
  • Arkansas ($2.85)
  • Oklahoma ($2.87)
  • Tennessee ($2.88)
  • North Carolina ($2.90)
  • South Carolina ($2.91)

Copyright 2021 Gray Media Group, Inc. All rights reserved. The Associated Press contributed to this report.