Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders raise their voices urging you to be counted in 2020 Census

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Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders raise their voices urging you to be counted in 2020 Census

Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders are being urged to be counted this year in the 2020 Census. Why is it so important? For the next ten years, statistics from the 2020 Census will inform decisions about critical public services helping native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders living in our community. And it will help decide how billions of federal dollars will be allocated.

A new music video called "This is Me 2020," is helping to get the message out. It features a blend of Native Hawaiian artists and Pacific Islanders raising their voices together in song. To learn more head to 2020census.gov. You can also watch the full video on the Hawaii News Now Facebook page.

More about the 2020 Census:

Once every decade America counts its population. So, starting mid-March households across Hawaii will be receiving an invitation to participate by mail, online or by phone in the 2020 Census. Mandated by Article I, Section 2 of the U.S. Constitution, The U.S. Census Bureau counts every resident in the United States. Not only are they counting people, they need to know where you live so the census can provide accurate population numbers for counties, states, municipals, etc. These numbers are used to draw school and voting districts. The count begins April 1, 2020.

It is important that everyone in your household is counted, every baby and young child and every elder, relative, or friend who may live under your roof.

The Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander population was one of the fastest-growing race groups in the United States between 2000 and 2010. As of the 2010 Census, this demographic group grew three times faster than the U.S. population. Responding to the 2020 Census is critical to ensuring Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islanders are counted and will inform vital policy and funding decisions that can help shape the future of your community and families.

Census statistics are used by local, state and federal governments to inform decisions on how to allocate billions of dollars in federal funds annually for the next 10 years on critical programs important for low-income people in the Hawaii community, which has a poverty rate almost 6 percent higher than the U.S. as a whole. Local, state, and federal leaders use census population statistics to decide where to fund critical public services for your community like education and schools, fire and police departments, roads and bridges, hospitals and healthcare programs, and more. Businesses use census statistics to help decide where to add jobs and services. Medicaid Insurance, the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) and the Section 8 Housing Choice Voucher program for low-income people are among the programs whose funding is based in part on census statistics. Census statistics are used by local, state, and federal governments to inform decisions on how to fund programs for schools and education in the NHPI community. Plus, Head Start early education for preschool children, teacher training, and programs for children with special education needs are among the programs whose federal funding is based in part on census statistics.

For more information: 2020census.gov.

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