Study: Expansion of Pacific marine national monuments didn’t harm fishing industry

Study: Expansion of Pacific marine national monuments didn’t harm fishing industry
(Image: NOAA)

HONOLULU, Hawaii (HawaiiNewsNow) - The expansion of the Pacific Remote Islands and Papahanaumokuakea marine national monuments didn’t economically harm Hawaii’s longline tuna fishing fleet, a new University of Hawaii study finds.

The findings were published in the journal Nature Communications.

For the study, researchers analyzed observer records, summary reports and detailed satellite data.

“We found that catch per unit effort has increased for the Hawaii-based longline industry following each expansion,” said economics Professor John Lynham, a co-author of the study. “The bottom line is that these monuments are not causing substantial economic losses to the fishery.”

The monuments were expanded significantly under the administrations of Presidents Bush and Obama. Before the most recent expansion, the fishing industry worried the move would slash their business.

The Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument encompasses more than 582,000 square miles, an area larger than all the country’s national parks combined.

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