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PEARL HARBOR-SHOOTING

Pearl Harbor shooting unfolded in 23 seconds in packed area

HONOLULU (AP) — A former military judge says it would have been easy to take weapons away from a sailor who killed two people at Pearl Harbor if he was facing punishment for a serious offense. A different military official says 22-year-old Gabriel Romero of Texas faced non-judicial punishment for minor misconduct. Retired Army Col. Gregory Gross says that could have been something as simple as being late for work. He says taking Romero off watch duty on a submarine and removing his service weapons would be easy for an offense like assault. Military officials said Friday that they hadn't found a motive yet. Romero also killed himself Wednesday in an attack in a packed area that lasted about 23 seconds.

PEARL HARBOR-LAST ARIZONA INTERMENT

Navy vet’s ashes destined for sunken Pearl Harbor battleship

PEARL HARBOR, Hawaii (AP) — Divers will place the ashes of a USS Arizona survivor in his ship's wreckage in Pearl Harbor during a ceremony this weekend. Lauren Bruner will be the 44th and last crew member interred on the Arizona in accordance with a rare Navy ritual. That’s because the last three living Arizona survivors plan to be laid to rest with their families. Bruner was from Southern California and died earlier this year at age 98. The ceremony and other events marking the 78th anniversary of the Pearl Harbor attack come after a deadly shooting at the Pearl Harbor Naval Shipyard. Wednesday's shooting left three dead, including the gunman.

NATIONAL PARK-FEES

Visitor fees going up at Haleakala National Park on Maui

WAILUKU, Hawaii (AP) — The National Park Service has announced an increase in visitor entrance fees at Haleakala National Park on Maui. The Maui News reported the rate increase will begin Jan. 1. Officials say a $5 increase will raise the entrance fee to $30 per vehicle and $25 per motorcycles. There will also be a $3 increase for bicycle riders and pedestrians to $15 per person. Park officials say the cost of a Tri-Park Pass will increase from $50 to $55. The annual pass allows visitors unlimited entry to Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, Haleakala National Park and Puuhonua o Hanaunau National Historical Park.

PLASTICS BAN-PASSED

Honolulu City Council passes ban on single-use plastics

HONOLULU (AP) — A single-use plastics ban that will be the first in Hawaii to include all plastic containers has been passed by the Honolulu City Council. The council voted Wednesday in favor of the measure that is expected to be signed by Mayor Kirk Caldwell. Food vendors will be prohibited from providing plastic forks, spoons, knives, straws, or other utensils and plastic foam plates, cups and other containers beginning Jan. 1, 2021. The ban will add other plastic food ware and begin applying to non-food-purveying businesses Jan. 1, 2022. Opponents and supporters held rallies recently over the proposal.

PEARL HARBOR-SHOOTING

Pearl Harbor commemoration to go on after fresh tragedy

HONOLULU (AP) — Officials will beef up security as usual for the ceremony to remember those lost in the attack on Pearl Harbor 78 years ago as a shooting this week is fresh on people's minds. A U.S. sailor killed two civilians, wounded another and then turned the gun on himself at the military base Wednesday. The Pearl Harbor National Memorial says the event on the anniversary of the Japanese bombing that propelled the United States into World War II will go on as planned Saturday.

MEASLES REPORT-INCORRECT

Hawaii health officials say school measles report mistaken

HONOLULU (AP) — Hawaii health officials say an elementary school sent a letter to families mistakenly reporting that a student had contracted measles. Hawaii Public Radio reported that the state Department of Education says the letter was sent by Daniel K. Inouye Elementary School on Oahu Monday. The state health department says there is not a new case of measles in the islands. The report originated from parents who believed their prekindergarten child had contracted the infectious disease. Health officials say they determined the child did not have measles and families of students received a second letter Tuesday informing them of the updated finding.