Roundabouts in a Kaneohe neighborhood are catching drivers off guard

Roundabouts in a Kaneohe neighborhood are catching drivers off guard
A dash cam captured multiple vehicles flying right over the roundabout at Anoi Road and Ulilehua Street in Kaneohe.

KANEOHE, Hawaii (HawaiiNewsNow) - Some residents are calling on the city to remove roundabouts that were recently constructed in a Kaneohe subdivision.

The circular structures located on Anoi and Luluku Roads were supposed to help reduce speeding, but neighbors say they’re just causing confusion.

"People are confused about what that roundabout is and they still speed," said resident Arley Nozawa. "You can hear them gassing their engine and then they get to the roundabout and they launch right over."

Nozawa says drivers speed through her neighborhood at all hours of the day to avoid traffic lights on Kamehameha Highway.

A dash cam captured multiple vehicles flying right over the roundabout at Anoi Road and Ulilehua Street.

Nozawa says her neighbors' parked cars and property have recently been hit by reckless drivers, and she says something needs to be done before someone gets seriously hurt.

"The neighbor, when she came home, she just opened her door and the car clipped the edge of her door. If this was their neighborhood and they had kids, I'm quite sure they wouldn't want people speeding through here," said Nozawa.

The issue was taken up by the Kaneohe Neighborhood Board last Thursday where more than 60 people showed up to complain.

"I heard things like tear them out and install speed bumps," said board chair Mo Radke. "Roundabouts are not famous in Hawaii, so folks have to learn how to use them. It was probably the right thing to do, it was just implemented improperly."

Radke says many residents are upset because they feel the city installed the roundabouts without the proper community input, education, and signage.

Some support lowering the speed limit in the subdivision, as well as adding other speed-reducing factors.

"I don't mind speed bumps. I also don't mind police presence because once folks know there is a police presence, people get the message and they slow down," Radke said.

The city's Department of Transportation Services says it worked with the community on this issue for the last nine years.

In a statement, the department said "community members preferred mini traffic circles and shoulder parking lanes for increased safety and reduced speeding," and that "the new circles and striping include warning signs and shoulder parking lanes, which calm traffic speeds."

Officials say they will continue to monitor the use of the roundabouts and resume studies of traffic patterns once the Pali Highway reopens.

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