Kabuki artists leave their mark on Hawaii by donating a valuable work of art

Kabuki artists leave their mark on Hawaii by donating a valuable work of art
Staff from the University of Hawaii were on hand to accept the donation of the screen. (Source: KZOO Radio)

HONOLULU (HawaiiNewsNow) - The University of Hawaii received a special gift from highly acclaimed kabuki artists performing in Hawaii this week.

The production of Kabuki In Hawaii returned to the islands for the first time in over 50 years. As a token of their appreciation and friendship, the cast donated an intricately crafted Asakura screen to UH Manoa.

The screen served as a backdrop for the kabuki performances at Kennedy Theatre.
The screen served as a backdrop for the kabuki performances at Kennedy Theatre. (Source: KZOO Radio)

The screen, which served as a backdrop during the performances at Kennedy Theatre, is valued at $100,000.

It was painted by artist Asakura Takafumi. The large screen was titled Matsukaze Byakko, or “White Tigers in the Pine Winds.”

From his home in Yokohama, Takafumi said, "It is my hope that the breadth of 400 years of Kabuki rides on the winds blowing through the pines as a symbol of the goodwill and friendship between Japan and Hawaii.”

University staff were on hand for the presentation, saying it was a wonderful surprise that will be treasured by the university for years to come.

Kabuki In Hawaii has one more sold-out show at the Honolulu Festival on March 8.

The shows in Hawaii took place to honor the 25th anniversary of the Honolulu Festival, along with the 150th anniversary of Gannenmono, or the first organized Japanese group to immigrate to Hawaii.

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