UH-Manoa students warned about jaywalking - Hawaii News Now - KGMB and KHNL

UH-Manoa students warned about jaywalking

William Easlea William Easlea
Neal Sakamoto Neal Sakamoto

By Duane Shimogawa - bio | email

MANOA (KHNL) - A warning Wednesday night for University of Hawaii at Manoa students.

By crossing Dole Street illegally, you may have to worry about more than getting hit by a car.

You might just get hit in the wallet. The warning is in response to complaints from the community and lots of near misses on Dole Street.

A jaywalker crosses the street as cars dodge around him. Just a few minutes before that, another man takes advantage of a small opening in traffic and jogs across.

This is an all-too familiar sight UH-Manoa Campus Security chief Neal Sakamoto hopes to curb because of campus-wide warnings about police in the area issuing tickets.

"A lot of times nowadays, students are busy," he said. "They got their iPods on, they're texting, they're emailing, they're on the phone, they're not paying attention, so we've had many near misses where a driver has almost hit students 'cuz they're not paying attention when they cross the street."

But students like William Easlea are on the defense.

"With jaywalking, it's just so easy like there are occasionally big gaps in traffic, so I find that perfect time to just cross the street," he said.

Especially when he and others are pressed for time.

"When I'm rushing to class, I do what I can to get to class as fast as I can, as long as it's not foolishly running through traffic," Easlea said.

But campus security officials want students to take the extra time to find a nearby crosswalk.

"Especially with the illegal crossing, it just becomes a hazardous condition, Dole Street is a busy roadway, lot of times people are speeding and so when people are crossing illegally, outside of the crosswalk, it causes a hazard," Sakamoto said.

A few extra steps that just may save their life.

The fine for jaywalking is a $130. If you don't pay up, then you get sent to court and if you don't show up, a warrant will be issued for your arrest.

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