Voting 101 - Hawaii News Now - KGMB and KHNL

Voting 101

Rex Quidilla Rex Quidilla

By Zahid Arab - bio | email

HONOLULU (KHNL) - In just days, Hawaii voters will head to the polls making their mark in highly contested state primary election contests.

Almost 700,000 voters are registered for Saturday, that's nearly half the population of the state.

Whether its for representative or the next mayor, those casting ballots need to beware of some important changes.

"Oops, oops, see I don't what know what to do," said a voter.

Class if this was you in 2006. we've got some work to do. Grab your pen and notebook, because this is "Voting 101." More than 275,000 Hawaii voters like these at a Kalihi polling place turned out to vote two years ago and some had some problems.

"There was this one time in one election via absentee mail process where someone cut their party ballots up and marked them separately," said Office of Elections Spokesman Rex Quidilla.

After updating its voting technology, the state says its ready. But being prepared before you go to the polls is important. Last time, nearly 4,000 ballots were thrown out because they were filled out wrong. A common mistake is voting for more than one party.

"The other case is over vote. Where a voter votes for more choices then allowed for a particular race," said Quidilla.

You pick your party first and then go on to the candidates. If you make a mistake, the voting machine will tell you when you slip your picks in. Simply go to a poll worker they'll help you correct your ballot or give you a new one.

The state has slimmed down its number of polling places by 4% so figure out where to go ahead of time and oh yeah, don't forget a picture ID.

"It's just a matter of voters taking the time to read instructions and vote properly," said Quidilla.

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