Waipio champions return to school in style - Hawaii News Now - KGMB and KHNL

Waipio champions return to school in style

Faye Yap Faye Yap
Amy Martinson Amy Martinson

By Tracy Gladden - bio | email

PEARL CITY (KHNL) - They've been gone for one month and students at Highlands Intermediate School welcome their world champion classmates home.

It was a parade of champions.

"Incredible, awesome, amazing. It's just something that I wish every parent could experience but were just so proud of the boys what they accomplished," Faye Yap said.

Three members of the World Champion Waipio Little League team return to school.

"They were saying congratulations, it felt good because knowing people supporting you it feels good," left fielder Matthew Yap said.

"It's good that they did this for us and we respect all of them," pitcher and first baseman Khade Paris said.

"We asked him 'do you know' we said 'do you realize what you folks have accomplished?' He said oh, 'we won the championship mom,' and that was it. After all this I'm sure he's very happy and very honored," Faye Yap said.

"I am the proudest principal and mother you could ever find because these are all of my children," principal Amy Martinson said.

The Hawaii Legislature presented the boys with a certificate to honor their success.

The presenter said, "By beating a team from Lake Charles, Louisiana in the last inning with six runs a come from behind victory. That's the most memorable game."

"The biggest moment was when we came back because we put a lot of effort and we believed," Paris said.

"When our starting catcher hit a home run after coming back from a hairline fracture," Matthew Yap said.

He says even though he was competing, it was fun to make new friends on the mainland.

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