NOAA scientists discover new fish in Hawaiian waters? - Hawaii News Now - KGMB and KHNL

NOAA scientists discover new fish in Hawaiian waters?

Dr. Jeff Drazen Dr. Jeff Drazen

By Diane Ako - bio | email & Sisto Domingo

HONOLULU (KHNL) - In tonight's earth and sea project report, a team of Hawaii scientists may have discovered a new species of fish in the Northwest Hawaiian islands. They're a NOAA team that returned this week from an expedition to study the beautiful fish and marine life there. Among the stunning scenery, they think they found a new species of fish.

Dr. Jeff Drazen detailed, "One of the animals we observed on this expedition was a fish called an eel pout. We don't know the species for certain, but it belongs to a family of fishes that have never been documented in the Hawaiian Islands."

These are the 3 eel pout, which have never been seen in Hawaiian waters before. These were at a depth of 10,000 feet. They're here eating bait fish. " They were attracted to the bait and they seemed to eat some of the other animals that were also attracted," said Drazen.

The research team plans to head back out to the Northwest Hawaiian Islands next year to catch some specimens-of eel pout and possibly other fish! "We stated investigating in the monument last year. So far we dropped the camera 15 times in the monument, which is a small number of times. But in that small time we've documented a large species of shark the sleeper sharks," enthuses Drazen.

This is the sleeper shark, common in other parts of the world, but seen for the first time in Hawaiian waters. The world may soon be reading about the work of this Hawaii crew. "We'd document results and submit to scientific publications so the science community and public can learn about our findings," said Drazen - heralding the vast biological treasures that remain to be discovered in these waters.

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