You could have money waiting for you! - Hawaii News Now - KGMB and KHNL

You could have money waiting for you!

Scott Kami Scott Kami
Roger Thoren Roger Thoren

By Paul Drewes - bio | email

HONOLULU (KHNL) - The state has millions of dollars, just waiting for people to collect.

And you could be on the list! It sounds like a get rich quick scheme, but it isn't. It's real.

Banks are where many of us keep our money, or other valuables in safety deposit boxes. But sometimes, those items are forgotten about or not claimed after a person dies. When that happens, the unclaimed property is turned over to the state.

Do you ever look for and just find money as you're walking on the sidewalk?

"Every day I look for money, cause every day the cost of living is going up higher," said Honolulu resident Michael Moot.

Or maybe you don't even look, and never know what you're missing. That's exactly what is going on here in Hawaii. Only we're not talking about a little change.

"Right now, we're holding $140 million that has been accumulated over a number of years," said Scott Kami with the State Budget and Finance Department.

Every year, the state adds to that total because people aren't claiming their cash.

"We normally get in $10 to $15 million a year and only give out about $6 million," added Kami.

Cold hard cash isn't the only thing the state has.

"We get a lot of interesting things. We have stocks, bonds and safety deposit box contents," said Kami.

The State holds onto jewelry, old coins or other valuables when people leave them behind in forgotten safe deposit boxes. But you can easily check to see if any of it is yours.

Roger Thoren found out a pleasant surprise when he looked, money for his father in-law.

"It was under $100, so it wasn't a significant amount. But still surprising that it was there and no one knew about it," said Thoren.

So take a look, because you never know what you might find.

While some people have up to a quarter million dollars waiting for them, the average amount for people with unclaimed property is several hundred dollars.

The easiest way to check if you're one of the lucky ones, call the Unclaimed Property Division at 586-1589 or click on the Unclaimed Property link on this page.

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