North Shore residents want whale carcass off their property - Hawaii News Now - KGMB and KHNL

North Shore residents want whale carcass off their property

Eddie Rothman's Eddie Rothman's
Russell Russell

By Tracy Gladden - bio | email

KAHUKU (KHNL) - Tow it out to sea. That's what one fed up North Shore property owner says about the whale that washed up on his land.

This sperm whale carcass washed up on Eddie Rothman's property more than a week ago.

"It's too decomposed, no it's not throw a cargo net over it and then there was something about 'oh we have to get a metal cargo net,' you know how much that costs?" said Rothman.  "Hey you know how much my land taxes cost me? Take the freaking thing out of here."

The Department of Land and Natural Resources and the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration are working together to find the quickest and safest way to dispose of the carcass.

Independent experts tell them towing it out to sea is not an option because it will break up into pieces and make the shark situation worse.

What's left of the whale carcass has been here for over a week and DLNR says it will take up to two months to chop it up into little pieces and then haul it away. It sure smells right now but imagine what it will smell like then.

"They don't want to give the option of 'hey we'll tow it out, oh we looked into towing it,' well why didn't you tow it before if you looked into it? They are full of crap," said Rothman.

"Ok, how long are we going to have to suffer here no I think it would be better to drag it out into the ocean," said Russell, a Kahuku resident.

"They have their own agenda they want this skeleton, it's worth a lot to them, that's why they let it come on the beach."

"We suggested a cargo net would do the job but they insist they want to cut it up and they want the skeleton."

DLNR says that's because the sperm whale is endangered and it's unusual to see this type wash up on land. A DLNR spokesman says it will look at other ways to intercept a whale carcass at sea and handle the situation better in the future.

NOAA says it plans to use the whale's skull and bones for scientific purposes but safety is its main concern.

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