A fueling gas myth revealed - Hawaii News Now - KGMB and KHNL

A fueling gas myth revealed

Jesse Fukuroku Jesse Fukuroku

By Duane Shimogawa - bio | email

HONOLULU (KHNL)- Hawaii has the third highest gas prices in the nation. More and more people are looking for ways to curb their usage of gas.

One of the most common tips many drivers believe saves on gas mileage is to turn off the air conditioning.

Speaking to island mechanics and others about the so called gas myth, what we found is it all comes down to speed.

Apparently, you will save on gas if you turn on your air conditioning when driving at speeds of 40mph or higher. When driving in stop and go traffic though, officials say it will keep more money in your wallet if you roll your windows down and turn your a/c off.

One mechanic says he has even noticed a steep decline of people coming in to repair their a/c, which is putting a strain on his business.

"We're trying to conserve electricity, the hours we're operating and it's bad right now, the whole industry is getting hurt," said the Jesse Fukuroku, owner of Jesse's Auto Repair.

Fukuroku believes people are choosing not to fix their a/c's because one it is a luxury to have it and two because of the sky rocketing gas prices.

So as far as the a/c myth goes officials say you may lose up to 10% more of your gas if you use your a/c while driving less than 40mph.

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