State May Cut Money For Homeless Programs - Hawaii News Now - KGMB and KHNL

State May Cut Money For Homeless Programs

By Beth Hillyer

HONOLULU (KHNL) -- Providing shelter for the homeless is a priority for many government and social service agencies.

But many are puzzled after word lawmakers want to slash 27 million dollars in emergency funds that help needy families.

Some homeless campers can't get into shelters because they're overcrowded.

Others simply can't live by the rules.

But for those who live in shelters, money to operate them is in jeopardy.

Many of Oahu's homeless count on the safety and security of shelters.

But it's expensive operating them.

The state counts on federal funds called temporary assistance for needy families.

But under this year's proposed budget, the state wants to cut 27 million dollars of this funding.

The full impact of the cut is not known right now,

But the director of the Institute for Human Services is fearful.

"This is money directly impacting people at risk for homelessness or already homeless, " explains I-H-S Director Connie Mitchell.

With record high rents many families who aren't homeless would be, without assistance.

"Many of our families that we are serving that can pay for a move which involves deposit and the first months rent so we help with deposits. It makes it easier for people to afford a new place."

Mitchell worries if the state refuses to release the 27 million dollars in emergency assistance funds, Hawaii's homeless problem will escalate.

"Probably the worst case scenario is that they might become homeless they might have to seek some kind of services but these are working families," reminds Mitchell.

Homeless advocates will ask lawmakers to release the funds.

"We don't want to make more shelters but we have quite a few new shelters and we do need resources to help people get out of shelters and end homelessness. That's the goal," concludes Mitchell.

HONOLULU (KHNL)--Providing shelter for the homeless is a priority for many government and social service agencies.

But many are puzzled after word lawmakers want to slash 27 million dollars in emergency funds that help needy families.

Some homeless campers can't get into shelters because they're overcrowded.

Others simply can't live by the rules.

But for those who live in shelters, money to operate them is in jeopardy.

Many of Oahu's homeless count on the safety and security of shelters.

But it's expensive operating them.

The state counts on federal funds called temporary assistance for needy families.

But under this year's proposed budget, the state wants to cut 27 million dollars of this funding.

The full impact of the cut is not known right now,

But the director of the Institute for Human Services is fearful.

"This is money directly impacting people at risk for homelessness or already homeless, " explains I-H-S Director Connie Mitchell.

With record high rents many families who aren't homeless would be, without assistance.

"Many of our families that we are serving that can pay for a move which involves deposit and the first months rent so we help with deposits. It makes it easier for people to afford a new place."

Mitchell worries if the state refuses to release the 27 million dollars in emergency assistance funds, Hawaii's homeless problem will escalate.

"Probably the worst case scenario is that they might become homeless they might have to seek some kind of services but these are working families," reminds Mitchell.

Homeless advocates will ask lawmakers to release the funds.

"We don't want to make more shelters but we have quite a few new shelters and we do need resources to help people get out of shelters and end homelessness. That's the goal," concludes Mitchell.

Job Link 8 Featured Jobs
Powered by Frankly