Hundreds March To Mark September 11 - Hawaii News Now - KGMB and KHNL

Hundreds March To Mark September 11

Federal Fire Department Chief Glenn DeLaura Federal Fire Department Chief Glenn DeLaura

By: Mari-Ela David

HONOLULU (KHNL) - The City of Honolulu remembers victims of the September Eleven terrorist attacks. Mayor Mufi Hanneman held the Second Annual Remembrance Walk Sunday evening.

The march started at police headquarters, and ended at Honolulu Hale. Many who came out either lost someone to nine eleven, or know of someone who died in the attacks. Marchers say, even to this day, their grief still runs deep.

Nearly six years have passed since nine eleven but grief still rings throughout the islands.

"We feel the hurt every year, we feel the hurt when we work everyday," says Federal Fire Department Chief Glenn DeLaura.

"I lost my brother-in-law. He was in the north tower of the World Trade Center so I have some sad memories about that," says Honolulu Police Department Deputy Chief Paul Putzulu.

Honolulu took steps to honor those who perished in the terrorist attacks.

Among those marching downtown - a former New York Police Officer who witnessed the Twin Towers explode.

"It goes beyond the realm of imagination, something like this you could never expect it to happen. Maybe to this day I'm still in a state of denial, actually did it happen? Oh yeah, because when I go back there today I don't see any buildings," says Karl Steininger.

If there's any comfort to nine eleven, marchers say it's in remembering loved ones.

"That's why I have this {magazine of New York} to keep around, so I never forget," says Teresa Leineweber, a former New York resident.

During the ceremony, Hawaii leaders laid a wreath not only to honor those who sacrificed their lives to save others, but also those who continue to protect the public's safety to this day.

More than 2900 people died in the September Eleven attacks.

About 340 of them were firefighters, 60 were police officers.

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