Hurricane Flossie Update from the Central Pacific Hurricane Center: 10 PM Tuesday - Hawaii News Now - KGMB and KHNL

Hurricane Flossie Update from the Central Pacific Hurricane Center: 10 PM Tuesday

Radar image of Flossie 10 PM Tuesday night Radar image of Flossie 10 PM Tuesday night
NASA image of Hurricane Flossie as seen from Earth orbit NASA image of Hurricane Flossie as seen from Earth orbit

MANOA (KHNL) - Howard Dashefsky speaks with Jim Weyman, director of the Central Pacific Hurricane Center.

Howard Dashefsky: Jim you have been tracking this storm since it came into the Central Pacific a few days ago. You are saying now there will be closer to five inches of rain, abig change from 24 hour ago when the prediction was for ten plus inches. What has happened to the storm itself?

Jim Weyman: As you look at the loop, you can see the high clouds start to disappear slowly. What that means is that the whole storm has decreased in height, and has therefore de-intensified.

HD: We talked earlier this evening about that technology allows you to track these storms almost to perfection; Flossie has not really gone off course from what you said several days ago.

JW: That's right.  The forecast track has been very, very accurate. It's only the intensity that has been somewhat of a problem.

HD: So for the next 24-48 hours for Maui County, Oahu, Kauai and beyond what should we expect?

JW: Really kind of a trade wind day, with winds being a little gustier than normal. Still, 1-2 inches of rain on the windward sides, gusts up to 30mph.

HD: And finally, for that Big Island rain, since it is not falling so fast and furious, hopefully it won't flood away... it could be a more beneficial rain for agriculture?

JW: Very true, because what we thought initially it would come down very hard and run off and cause flash flooding. But, by coming down very slowly it can sink in and help prevent some of the dryness.

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