Hurricane Center Eyeing Flossie's Path - Hawaii News Now - KGMB and KHNL

Hurricane Center Eyeing Flossie's Path

Meteorologist Jim Weyman Meteorologist Jim Weyman

By: Mari-Ela David

UNIVERSITY OF HAWAII (KHNL) - The Central Pacific Hurricane Center says the eye of the storm is not expected to hover over our islands, but experts warn Flossie is still a threat.

Hurricane experts say Hawaii is not expected to take a direct hit from Hurricane Flossie, but they warn that Mother Nature has a track record of suddenly changing gears.

"We're good at forecasting but we're not that good. People should really pay attention to what's happening and be aware because it's like change, one way or the other could impact a lot of people and they might need to take protective action, says Hurricane Center Meteorologist Jim Weyman.

Weyman says Flossie is expected to still be a hurricane when it approaches Hawaii Island, then downgrade to a tropical storm after it passes the Island of Hawaii, and weaken further after as it heads towards Kauai.

"Because it will be decreasing in intensity, Oahu, Kauai and Maui will probably just have a normal tradewind type day with some rain showers. It's only the Big Island that we're worried about at this time," says Weyman.

Meteorologists say Flossie will technically bring 39 mile per hour winds to Hawaii Island but the island's terrain could swirl gusts up to 59 miles per hour. The Hurricane Center says that force is strong enough to pose a potential threat to residents on the Island of Hawaii.

Experts say if Hurricane Iniki has taught us anything, the slightest change in weather could spell danger.

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