ArmyTeam Handles Explosives, Keeps Servicemen Safe - Hawaii News Now - KGMB and KHNL

ArmyTeam Handles Explosives, Keeps Servicemen Safe

Spc. Nicholas Trueman Spc. Nicholas Trueman

By Stephen Florino

(KHNL) - A US Army explosives team says the Moloka'i landfill is safe. Two groups of military ordnance was found at the island's only landfill on Wednesday, and last week.

A three-man team from the 706th Explosive Ordnance Disposal Company went there, and disposed of the first group.

The team deemed the second one was not a hazard, but urged that the recycling area of the landfill remain closed.

The ultimate goal of the 706 is protection. And team members say they enjoy doing it.

The protective suit.

The big gun.

And remote controlled robots.

they may look like cool toys, but these are actually vital weapons for the army's 706th company.

"We have a primary job of protecting life, limb, and property of both military and civilian personnel," said Maj. Stephen Kavanaugh.

Their specialty is explosive ordnance disposal. For example, these robots can go in and recover a bomb, instead of sending a man.

"We would send the robot, and if there was anything to bring back, we would take it, possibly to a safe area that we've established where no one's at," said Specialist Nicholas Trueman.

And that's important in the war zone.

"Every IED or raodside bomb that we take care of is one less opportunity to take an American life away," said Specialist Michael Smith.

"Believe it or not, I thought it was pretty fun. It was a challenge everyday, and i'm always up for a challenge."

But you don't have to go far to find a challenge.

Besides assisting at Molokai's landfill, team members also help local authorities with any suspicious packages, and anything else that's discovered.

And since Hawaii has many training areas and former war zones, it is a lot.

"All in a days work," said Kavanaugh. "Part of our mission, and part of what we expect to do every single day."

The 706 also handles chemical, biological, and nuclear explosives. And they say they are always ready, and willing.

  • Hawaii News Now headlinesNewsMore>>

  • Shame, fear: Survivors explain not reporting sexual assaults

    Shame, fear: Survivors explain not reporting sexual assaults

    Friday, September 21 2018 6:20 PM EDT2018-09-21 22:20:29 GMT
    Saturday, September 22 2018 1:23 PM EDT2018-09-22 17:23:05 GMT
    (AP Photo/Alex Brandon, File). FILE - In this Sept. 6, 2018 file photo, President Donald Trump's Supreme Court nominee, Brett Kavanaugh testifies before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington for the third day of his confirmation ...(AP Photo/Alex Brandon, File). FILE - In this Sept. 6, 2018 file photo, President Donald Trump's Supreme Court nominee, Brett Kavanaugh testifies before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington for the third day of his confirmation ...
    Survivors respond with fury to Trump's remarks on woman who accused court nominee of sexual assault.More >>
    Survivors respond with fury to Trump's remarks on woman who accused court nominee of sexual assault.More >>
  • Study of puzzling fossils confirms they came from an animal

    Study of puzzling fossils confirms they came from an animal

    Thursday, September 20 2018 2:18 PM EDT2018-09-20 18:18:23 GMT
    Saturday, September 22 2018 12:04 PM EDT2018-09-22 16:04:57 GMT
    (Ilya Bobrovskiy/Australian National University via AP). This undated photo provided by Ilya Bobrovskiy in September 2018 shows a Dickinsonia fossil from the White Sea area of Russia. The body is about 9 centimeters (3.5 inches) long. In a report relea...(Ilya Bobrovskiy/Australian National University via AP). This undated photo provided by Ilya Bobrovskiy in September 2018 shows a Dickinsonia fossil from the White Sea area of Russia. The body is about 9 centimeters (3.5 inches) long. In a report relea...
    Scientists say puzzling fossils from more than 500 million years ago are traces of an animal.More >>
    Scientists say puzzling fossils from more than 500 million years ago are traces of an animal.More >>
  • Bye bye bugs? Scientists fear non-pest insects are declining

    Bye bye bugs? Scientists fear non-pest insects are declining

    Thursday, September 20 2018 1:19 AM EDT2018-09-20 05:19:36 GMT
    Saturday, September 22 2018 12:04 PM EDT2018-09-22 16:04:54 GMT
    (AP Photo/Don Ryan). FILE - In this May 26, 2010 file photo, a Coccinellidae, more commonly known as a ladybug or ladybird beetle, rests on the petals of a rose in Portland, Ore. A study estimates a 14 percent decline in ladybugs in the United States a...(AP Photo/Don Ryan). FILE - In this May 26, 2010 file photo, a Coccinellidae, more commonly known as a ladybug or ladybird beetle, rests on the petals of a rose in Portland, Ore. A study estimates a 14 percent decline in ladybugs in the United States a...

    Scientists are noticing fewer and fewer moths, ladybugs, fireflies and butterflies, but they can't quite quantify what's happening to flying insects because they never measured how many bugs there used to be.

    More >>

    Scientists are noticing fewer and fewer moths, ladybugs, fireflies and butterflies, but they can't quite quantify what's happening to flying insects because they never measured how many bugs there used to be.

    More >>
Powered by Frankly