Hawaii Can't Help Falling in Love with Elvis, Again - Hawaii News Now - KGMB and KHNL

Hawaii Can't Help Falling in Love with Elvis, Again

Carmen Vierra Carmen Vierra
Keith and Kitty Spillane Keith and Kitty Spillane

By Leland Kim

HONOLULU (KHNL) -- Hawaii can't help falling in love, again, with Elvis. Thursday, fans gather for an event honoring the king of rock and roll.

The big event is the dedication of a life-size statue of Elvis Presley. He's had a love affair with Hawaii for half a century, and Thursday fans came here to honor the legendary singer.

The "King" has Hawaii all shook up. Fans proudly show off their favorite memorabilia. And some even wear Elvis, like Mo'ili'ili resident Carmen Vierra, who saw him perform more than 40 years ago.

"Oh, he's handsome," she said. "He's great. His skin is beautiful. He's so friendly."

Fans from all over the world gather, singing Elvis' hits.

From as far away as Scotland to down the street in McCully, these fans are united by their love for Elvis and his music.

Like honeymooners Keith and Kitty Spillane, who got engaged at Graceland, Elvis' Tennessee estate.

"And then we came to Hawaii," said Keith Spillane. "We eloped. We got married on Maui."

They flew over to Oahu, and found out about this event by accident.

"It's just a fluke," said Keith and Kitty Spillane. "We saw a poster advertising this event. We said, 'Wow! It's come full circle.'"

And then, the moment these Elvis fans have been waiting for.

"Ladies and gentlemen, the King has returned," said Larry Jones, president of TV Land. "And the people of TV Land bring you Elvis Presley!"

Stage curtains parted to unveil the life-size bronze statue of Elvis. It commemorates his historic "Aloha from Hawaii Concert" in 1973.

For the Spillanes, they couldn't have asked for a better honeymoon.

"What a great way to start a marriage," said KHNL.

"Fantastic!" said the Spillanes. "It's a good omen. Yes! Elvis is in our relationship."

Kitty and Keith Spillane can't help falling in love with each other, and with Elvis.

Organizers said this is a fitting tribute to a man they call Hawaii's adopted son.

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