Low-Income Family Moves Into Muti Million Dollar Home - Hawaii News Now - KGMB and KHNL

Low-Income Family Moves Into Muti Million Dollar Home

Dorie-Ann Kahale Dorie-Ann Kahale
Genshiro Kawamoto Genshiro Kawamoto

by: Beth Hillyer

(KHNL) - About 3-thousand applied. But just three lucky families on Oahu received keys today to a luxurious Kahala home. All thanks to a billionaire from Japan.

The families will be allowed to live there for up to ten years. They won't pay any rent, but they will need to take care of their utility bills.

Genshiro Kawamoto will rent out eight of his properties in Kahala to low-income families. One of them had been living at the shelter in Kalaeloa.

Now they're residents of the richest neighborhood in Honolulu!

Kawamoto planned to charge them 150-dollars a month in rent. But the real estate investor says he changed his mind and will let them live there, rent-free!

And he shocked them with another gift: one thousand dollars in cash.

When we arrived around dinner time Dorie-Ann Kahale's ohana was busy checking out their new home and she invited us in as well.

Kahale still can't believe it's hers. But already she is filling her new home up with her prized possessions. Her family, "It's full of life lot a life. I have a lot of children and grandchildren, gonna bring a lot of life to this community. Aloha actually that's what it will bring."

Now the Kahale family is not moving in tonight, in fact they are going to come back tomorrow and do some major spring cleaning before they move in. Dorie-Ann says,

"We are just looking around on what needs to be cleaned up per our contract with Mr. Kawamoto taking care of the land house, dust it down."

Already the fridge is full of ice cold juice. It goes nicely with piping hot pizza on the new dining room table.

"Excitement everything gathers in the kitchen we are hawaiians so we love to eat and that's where we gather a lot in the kitchen to discuss what we are planning on doing for the home, " says Kahale

The girls including twin teenagers have picked their rooms. Getting ready to soon spend their first night in the Kahala home. Dorie-Ann sums it up.

"No matter how far we have come, from being homeless, God has answered our prayers."

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