Kaneohe Man Earns Two Prestigious Athletic Awards - Hawaii News Now - KGMB and KHNL

Kaneohe Man Earns Two Prestigious Athletic Awards

By Diane Ako

SAN DIEGO (KHNL)- A Kaneohe doctor was honored as the Humanitarian of the Year at Saturday night's Competitor Magazine Endurance Sports Awards Gala at Sea World in San Diego.

Labeled "The Academy Awards of Endurance Sports" by Entertainment Tonight, the evening sells out with 600 attendees all there to celebrate the accomplishments of the amazing athletes being honored.

Lt. Andy Baldwin, a three-time U.S. Triathlon All-American, six-time Ironman finisher and Navy doctor, qualified and competed in the Ford Ironman World Championship in 2006, finishing with a strong performance and personal best of 9 hrs. 45 minutes, including a 3:35 run split.

Baldwin's humanitarian work includes his volunteer service at Aloha Medical Mission in Kalihi, Oahu, a nonprofit medical group that runs a free clinic for uninsured patients, as well as coordinates overseas missions to help impoverished communities overseas.

In January, Baldwin won the 2007 Triathlete Magazine Humanitarian Award, which is awarded each year to an inspirational triathlete who has best demonstrated the humanitarian spirit and who has personally taken on the role of 'aid station' in the lives of others.

"Andy Baldwin inspires people. He is a very talented, motivated triathlete and he sets a great example for others to contribute," Said John Duke, CEO of Triathlete Magazine.

Commenting on the Triathlete Magazine Humanitarian Award, Lieutenant Baldwin stated, "My model of service was forged in the Navy. I want to bring the service ethic back to the forefront. As endurance athletes, we are extremely dedicated individuals, putting countless hours of energy into training and competing. It is important that we give some of that energy back to the people who need it most."

Baldwin's accomplishments don't end there. He was named Top 100 Most Influential People in Outside Magazine in 2006 for his work in Laos last summer on a military mission where he treated over 600 Laotians in remote mountain villages for ailments such as malaria, dengue fever, parasites, and malnutrition.

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