Hokulea Turns Back Because of Problem - Hawaii News Now - KGMB and KHNL

Hokulea Turns Back Because of Problem

By: Beth Hillyer

Kailua-Kona (KHNL) The two voyaging canoes on their way to Micronesia are turning back.

After reaching South Point on the Big Island a steering problem forces the canoes to head to Kona.

This steering problem may have temporarily taken the wind from their sails.

They had been underway for nearly 24 hours when forced to turn back.

The two voyaging canoes, Hokulea and Alingano Maisu will stay in Kona until repairs can be made.

It's a setback in the seven thousand mile voyage, an epic journey with a rough start.

First gusty winds delayed the departure for the past week. Finally when favorable winds rolled in this happens.

Apparently the crew noticed a crack on the handle on one of the steering sweeps.

Canoe captains decided it was better to fix the problem now since they were still offshore Hawaii island.

Here's the timeline. The canoes left Kawaihae harbor at sunset last night. They made it to South Point when the crack became apparent. They turned back and are heading to Kona.

The President of the Polynesian Voyaging Society, Nainoa Thompson says no one is hurt, everyone is safe, but it must be repaired before they go on. The repairs could take a few days.

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