Officer Fires At Suspect In Windward Oahu - Hawaii News Now - KGMB and KHNL

Officer Fires At Suspect In Windward Oahu

Lieutenant Robert Cravalho Lieutenant Robert Cravalho

By Paul Drewes

(KHNL) - A shot is fired in a quiet Windward Oahu neighborhood by police.

Now, a manhunt is on for a suspect who allegedly took aim at a Honolulu Police Department officer.

It all began on Kaimalolo Place, where police were called because a stolen car was spotted on the street.

"The officer approached the vehicle thinking it was unoccupied, was surprised it was occupied. The suspect started the vehicle and started to drive toward the officer, almost striking the officer. The officer discharged one round and the vehicle took off," says Lt. Robert Cravalho, of the Honolulu Police Department.

The car was abandoned on Waiahole Homestead Road a short time later, after the shooting, as the suspect fled.

The car bears a single bullet hole in the hood, on the passenger side.

The car had been stolen from a Windward home on Friday night and, according to the car's owner, the thief had been busy over the past few days modifying his stolen ride.

"They painted the side, they fixed the dent I had in it, they took off the hubcaps and they removed both seat rests and they put different tags on it," says the car's owner, David Underwood.

But while the stolen car has been recovered, the suspect is still on the loose.

A fact that makes neighbors of Kaimalolo Place, a quiet windward street, nervous.

Police do have a description of the driver now wanted in this investigation.

"We're looking for a male , 30s , local about 5'9", 160 on the thin side. long brown hair, wearing a goatee, last seen wearing a red jacket and blue pants," says Cravalho.

The officer who fired the shot, a two and a half year veteran of the force, is now on administrative leave while police conduct an internal investigation.

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