New Booster Seat Law - Hawaii News Now - KGMB and KHNL

New Booster Seat Law

Charisse Esperanza Charisse Esperanza
Kim Tom Kim Tom
Charisse Esperanza shops for booster seats for her two young children Charisse Esperanza shops for booster seats for her two young children
A new booster law takes effect on January 1, 2006 A new booster law takes effect on January 1, 2006

by: Joann Shin

(KHNL) - With two young kids and one on the way, Charisse Esperanza is all about safety, especially when driving with her two boys. "This one has a regular seat and that one has a booster," explained Esperanza.

Soon, children between four and seven years old will need a booster seat, when traveling in a car.

Esperanza already puts 4 year old Jaden in one.

She said, "Because I care for my kids and now a days there are a lot of accidents going on."

But store owner Tom Kim says not every parent is aware of the changes.

"Apparently a lot of them are surprised that there is a new law," explained Kim, who owns Baby Emporium.

Booster seats cost between $40 and $250 dollars.

Features range from an adjustable head rest to a 5 point harness.

According to Kim, "You want to get a booster seat that has a seat back, where it actually adjusts the seat belt position, so that the seat belt goes right over the child's shoulder and right at the chest, the strongest part."

The seat belt should also rest low and tight across the lap

Kim says a seat belt alone won't provide a child enough protection during an accident.

Kim said with just a seat belt, "In an severe accident, the child would actually go into the seat and would be right around the child's neck area"

A booster seat isn't required, if a child is taller than 4 feet 9 inches or there are only lap belts in the back seat.

For Esperanza she won't leave home without one.

She said, "I feel much better because at least I know I put my kid in a car seat."

  • Hawaii News Now headlinesNewsMore>>

  • UN: Excessive drinking killed over 3 million people in 2016

    UN: Excessive drinking killed over 3 million people in 2016

    Saturday, September 22 2018 2:20 PM EDT2018-09-22 18:20:51 GMT
    Tuesday, September 25 2018 11:34 AM EDT2018-09-25 15:34:24 GMT
    (AP Photo/Alexander F. Yuan, FILE). FILE- In this Nov. 27, 2012 file photo, a customer checks bottles of imported wine at a supermarket in Beijing. The World Health Organization said in a report published Friday Sept. 21, 2018,  that drinking too much ...(AP Photo/Alexander F. Yuan, FILE). FILE- In this Nov. 27, 2012 file photo, a customer checks bottles of imported wine at a supermarket in Beijing. The World Health Organization said in a report published Friday Sept. 21, 2018, that drinking too much ...
    The World Health Organization says that drinking too much alcohol killed more than 3 million people in 2016, mostly men.More >>
    The World Health Organization says that drinking too much alcohol killed more than 3 million people in 2016, mostly men.More >>
  • Critical crash closes Kamehameha Highway in Waiahole

    Critical crash closes Kamehameha Highway in Waiahole

    Tuesday, September 25 2018 11:11 AM EDT2018-09-25 15:11:59 GMT
    (Image: Hawaii News Now)(Image: Hawaii News Now)
    (Image: Hawaii News Now)(Image: Hawaii News Now)
    Kamehameha Highway is closed in both directions at Waiahole Homestead Road, the state Department of Transportation said. Authorities are responding to a critical crash involving a pedestrian. This story will be updated. Copyright 2018 Hawaii News Now. All rights reserved.More >>
    Kamehameha Highway is closed in both directions at Waiahole Homestead Road, the state Department of Transportation said. Authorities are responding to a critical crash involving a pedestrian. This story will be updated. Copyright 2018 Hawaii News Now. All rights reserved.More >>
  • Bye bye bugs? Scientists fear non-pest insects are declining

    Bye bye bugs? Scientists fear non-pest insects are declining

    Thursday, September 20 2018 1:19 AM EDT2018-09-20 05:19:36 GMT
    Tuesday, September 25 2018 10:45 AM EDT2018-09-25 14:45:54 GMT
    (AP Photo/Don Ryan). FILE - In this May 26, 2010 file photo, a Coccinellidae, more commonly known as a ladybug or ladybird beetle, rests on the petals of a rose in Portland, Ore. A study estimates a 14 percent decline in ladybugs in the United States a...(AP Photo/Don Ryan). FILE - In this May 26, 2010 file photo, a Coccinellidae, more commonly known as a ladybug or ladybird beetle, rests on the petals of a rose in Portland, Ore. A study estimates a 14 percent decline in ladybugs in the United States a...

    Scientists are noticing fewer and fewer moths, ladybugs, fireflies and butterflies, but they can't quite quantify what's happening to flying insects because they never measured how many bugs there used to be.

    More >>

    Scientists are noticing fewer and fewer moths, ladybugs, fireflies and butterflies, but they can't quite quantify what's happening to flying insects because they never measured how many bugs there used to be.

    More >>
Powered by Frankly