Christmas Train Is Cancer Fundraiser - Hawaii News Now - KGMB and KHNL

Christmas Train Is Cancer Fundraiser

Taylor Iwanaka Taylor Iwanaka
Kaela Taeho Kaela Taeho
Mina Humphreys Mina Humphreys
Hilton Hawaiian Village Hilton Hawaiian Village

by: Diane Ako

WAIKIKI (KHNL) - In hawaii, approximately 60 children and teens are diagnosed with cancer each year, according to one health group. It's a financially and emotionally draining time for families. But a Waikiki hotel is trying to help.

Dozens line up for a ride on a train that puts the "fun" in fundraiser. 7 year old Taylor Iwanaka is in remission from leukemia. "I'm really happy people buy the tickets because it can help other people who have cancer." She likes the train "because I get to see different people."

7 year old Kaela Taeho is still going through cancer treatments. "You have to go to the hospital and have tests." Kaela loves the ride "because it's fun."

Hilton Hawaiian Village ran the train for 10 days. The money goes to the Hawaii Children's Cancer Foundation. It helps families pay bills medical insurance won't cover. Mina Humphreys is Chair of the Fundraising Committee, and a grandmother of a boy with leukemia. "A lot of times one of the parents have to give up a job to take care of the child. You have intense health worries and financial worries when you lost an income."

But those are worries far away for young children like Taylor and Kaela. For them, Santa's Rainbow Express Train brings out big smiles- which is something money can't buy.

This was the last day for the train, but you can still donate money to the Hawaii Children's Cancer Foundation. http://www.hccf.org/

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