Police Launch Negligent Homicide Investigation After Deadly Crash - Hawaii News Now - KGMB and KHNL

Police Launch Negligent Homicide Investigation After Deadly Crash

Aug 3, 2006 11:39 PM

 by Darren Pai

HONOLULU (KHNL) - Honolulu police opened a negligent homicide investigation after an early morning crash Thursday in Kapahulu left one man dead and another in critical condition.

The collision happened shortly after 4 a.m. near the intersection of Date and Mahiai Streets near Iolani School.

"I thought a plane crashed, it was that loud," said Tony Caldiero, a Date Street resident.

Police said a 1995 blue Ford Mustang hit a parked truck. The truck hit another parked car. The mustang then clipped a fourth car. That impact flipped the mustang over.

Police said speed, alcohol and drugs contributed to the crash.

"Heard this big crash. I mean bam bam bam bam," said Joseph Mantanona of Date Street. "Went out there, and see the guy hanging, his leg stuck in the car."

The passenger, a 23-year-old Honolulu man, died at the scene. The 32- year-old driver was taken to the Queen's Medical Center in critical condition.

"He was yelling please lift the car up. And we asked him was anybody else in the car and he said his buddy," said Devie Mantanona of Date Street.

The investigation forced police to shut down parts of Date Street for nearly four hours.

Police said the car was speeding, something residents said is all too common along Date Street.

"Sounded like it was going faster before it hit," Caldiero said.

"People just speed too much on this road," Devie Mantanona said. "They need to slow down."

Police said they sympathize with residents who complain about speeding on Date Street. But the Police said they've received few official complaints about reckless driving in the area.

"People in the communities, if you have speeding on the streets, you have to call police, you have to call 911 so we can know that," said Capt. Frank Fujii, HPD spokesman.

"The safest streets can become dangerous when drivers don't obey posted speed signs, they elect to drink and drive or do drugs," Fujii said.

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