Fehring Speaks Out About Ka Loko Dam Tragedy - Hawaii News Now - KGMB and KHNL

Fehring Speaks Out About Ka Loko Dam Tragedy

Bruce Fehring talks to KHNL News 8 reporter Diane Ako on his Kilauea property. Bruce Fehring talks to KHNL News 8 reporter Diane Ako on his Kilauea property.
Bruce Fehring Bruce Fehring
Aftermath of Ka Loko Dam break back in March of this year. Aftermath of Ka Loko Dam break back in March of this year.

by Diane Ako

Kilauea, KAUAI (KHNL) - The homeowners whose properties were damaged by the Ka Loko Dam breach meet with county officials on Tuesday July 11th.  They'll hear the latest twist to the funding fiasco that's bogged down the cleanup.

Landowner Bruce Fehring suffered the most. He lost three relatives and four friends in the breach.

Debris is still scattered across his property, nearly four months after the disaster. Fehring's house completely washed away. He's frustrated it's taking so long.

"People were lost. My family members died. My friends died. My home was washed away. My property was decimated. FEMA has not stepped up to the plate."

Kauai County says it will tap into the Civil Defense emergency fund of $1 million to start removing the debris. It says it's currently hiring contractors to do the job. The county says once it does start the work, it should only take 3 to 6 months to finish.

According to Kauai County spokesperson Mary Daubert, county funds were used:

a) To hire Earth Tech, Inc., a consultant prioritizing debris removal activities and securing permits.

b) To hire Rick Hearst for hazardous material removal.

"Next step is to hire a solid waste consultant to supervise and direct contractors on debris removal," explains Daubert.

Also, State Attorney General Mark Bennett Friday announced his selection for the special deputy attorney general to investigate the Ka Loko dam break. Hawaii attorney Robert Carson Godbey is expected to begin his probe next week.

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