As Hurricane Olivia nears, extent of damage left behind by Lane comes into focus

As Hurricane Olivia nears, extent of damage left behind by Lane comes into focus
Rains from Hurricane Lane battered the state, including Kauai. (Image: Terry Lilley)

HONOLULU (HawaiiNewsNow) - The full impacts of Hurricane Lane on the state are coming into sharper focus, just as the islands prepare for potential winds and heavy rains from Hurricane Olivia.

This week, the governor asked the president for a disaster declaration to help the state cover the mounting costs of Hurricane Lane-related recovery.

And that request included the latest damage assessments from Lane, which brought torrential rain and widespread flooding to the islands from Aug. 22-29.

Here's a look at the damage that's been cataloged so far:

Big Island

  • Parts of the island got more than 4 feet of rain, triggering widespread flooding and washing out roads.
  • Firefighters rescued at least 39 people from rising floodwaters.
  • The torrential rains overwhelmed three sewage pump stations, sending more than 9 million gallons of untreated sewage into Hilo Bay.

Maui

  • Three wind-whipped wildfires quickly spread, forcing more than 300 people to evacuate and destroying more than 20 homes.
  • Maui Electric also needed to replace 45 utility poles due to the hurricane, which dropped more than 16 inches of rain in east Maui.
  • Three homes remain inaccessible after storm water and debris washed out a road. The road will take months to replace.

Kauai

In all, the state says 211 homes statewide were destroyed or damaged by Hurricane Lane. Of those, 25 were destroyed while 32 sustained major damage.

Across the three counties, damage left behind by the storm to state properties is estimated at more than $22 million. That figure includes damage to public buildings, debris removal and damage to roads and bridges.

MORE: Read the full assessment by clicking here.

In his letter to President Trump, Gov. David Ige said Hurricane Lane hit in the wake of other significant natural disasters, including the Kauai flooding and eruptions on the Big Island that destroyed whole communities.

"While fewer homes were destroyed by the effects of Hurricane Lane, the ability of impacted residents to recover is challenged by the reality that government, community and voluntary agency resources have been depleted by the earlier disasters," Ige wrote. "Additional federal support is needed for Hurricane Lane response and recovery efforts."

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