Hector moves away from islands as powerful Category 4 hurricane - Hawaii News Now - KGMB and KHNL

Hector moves away from islands as powerful Category 4 hurricane

Hurricane Hector visible from space. (Image: NASA) Hurricane Hector visible from space. (Image: NASA)
Hurricane Hector is expected to move in a northwest direction, tracking far away from the Hawaiian islands (Image: Central Pacific Hurricane Center) Hurricane Hector is expected to move in a northwest direction, tracking far away from the Hawaiian islands (Image: Central Pacific Hurricane Center)
Hurricane Hector remains far to the south-southwest of Hawaii as a major Category 3 storm. (Image: Central Pacific Hurricane Center) Hurricane Hector remains far to the south-southwest of Hawaii as a major Category 3 storm. (Image: Central Pacific Hurricane Center)
HONOLULU (HawaiiNewsNow) -

Hurricane Hector is moving away from the Hawaiian islands after passing south of the state this week, pushing up surf and contributing to wet weather in some spots.

At 5 a.m. Friday, it strengthened into a major Category 4 storm, packing maximum sustained winds near 130 mph with higher gusts.

It was situated about 575 miles west-southwest of Honolulu, and was moving west-northwest near 16 mph. 

On its current track, Hector is churning west-northwest and poses no significant threat to the main Hawaiian Islands. It's expected to turn toward the northwest from Friday night through Saturday night, tracking far away from Johnston Island. 

Hurricane-force winds extend up to 35 miles from the center of the storm, and tropical-storm-force winds extend outward up to 110 miles.

As Hector passed south of the state on Tuesday, it brought along with it a plume of tropical moisture that made for a cloudy and wet trade wind day.

In addition, a swell generated by the storm brought dangerously large surf to south shores. 

Go to the Hawaii News Now Weather page for the latest forecast or check out our Interactive radar.
To get the latest weather conditions on your mobile device click HERE.

This story will be updated.

Copyright 2018 Hawaii News Now. All rights reserved.

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