ARCHIVE: Documents allege Peter Boy was tied to bedpost, forced - Hawaii News Now - KGMB and KHNL

ARCHIVE: Documents allege Peter Boy was tied to bedpost, forced to eat feces

(Image: Hawaii News Now) (Image: Hawaii News Now)
(Image: Hawaii News Now) (Image: Hawaii News Now)

The following story on the disappearance of Peter Boy Kema was first broadcast by a Hawaii News Now station on May 31, 2005. For an extended look at the investigation into Peter Boy's disappearance, tune in to 'Lynn Kawano Investigates: Inside The Search For Peter Boy' at 6:30 p.m. on Thursday, July 20, 2017. 


The 2,000 pages of documents contain accounts of physical and psychological abuse suffered by Peter Boy Kema.

A report from a former foster parent claims Peter Boy's siblings told her the child was tied to a bedpost using a so that he couldn't get to the kitchen for food.

When Peter Boy was actually fed, his mother allegedly force fed him until he vomited, while his father served him rice with worms in it.

Another report says Peter Boy was forced to eat feces.

“It's been eight years with nothing happening, and we are hoping that what (the release of these documents) will do is shake loose and break loose the log jam, and get some justice for this child,” said Lillian Koller, former Hawaii Department of Human Services director.

The documents delve into the backgrounds of Peter Boy's parents, saying his mother Jaylin had a limited attachment to the child, while his father Peter Sr. was described as explosive.

One social worker’s account says the elder Kema questioned whether Peter Boy was truly his son.

The state’s Human Services department says the docket is all the information it has on Peter Boy, noting only court documents have been omitted.

The dossier does help answer at least one question: whether a statement from Peter Boy's half-sister can be believed.

In a 1998 interview, a clinical psychologist quotes her as saying she saw Peter Boy in a box – dead – and that her parents had taken the box to Honolulu.

“The law enforcement community could still do something about getting some justice here,” said Koller. “They could evaluate these records and see if maybe they can get an indictment.”

And, ultimately, some justice for the little boy who suffered more than anyone should.

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