Movie Review: THE SENSE OF AN ENDING - Hawaii News Now - KGMB and KHNL

TERRY'S TAKE

Movie Review: THE SENSE OF AN ENDING

     If you’re interested in seeing a movie that stirs your emotions AND makes you think, try THE SENSE OF AND ENDING at Kahala.

     You may not know the fine English actor, Jim Broadbent, by name, but chances are you’ve seen him play supporting character roles.

      In THE SENSE OF AN ENDING, he’s a man in his sixties who learns that his memories of what happened 50 years earlier don’t correspond to the actual facts.

      And that discovery eventually changes his approach to the people he cares about.

Antony (voice over): How often do we tell our own life story? The story of our life told to others but mainly to ourselves. What you end up remembering isn’t always what you exactly witnessed.  

       Broadbent is Antony, a mostly retired man in his sixties with an ex-wife and a pregnant daughter.

       He’s a bit of a curmudgeon whose life is upended when he receives a letter written by the now deceased mother of his college girlfriend. 

woman’s voice: Dear Tony, I think it right that you should have the attached and perhaps you’ll find it an interesting if painful memento of long ago. 

         Antony is completely taken aback. But the diary that’s supposed to be “attached” is missing.

        He tells his ex-wife about the letter and, for the first time, about Veronica, the young woman who was his first love back in college. He also tells his daughter.

Antony: We broke up is the point while we were still at university. Not long after, she formed a relationship with my best friend. I wrote them both a very nasty letter.

         But it turns out his best friend, Adrian, killed himself soon after and Antony has always believed his nasty letter was the likely cause. He hasn’t seen Veronica since they broke up, but she supposedly has the missing diary.

       So he seeks out the older Veronica played by Charlotte Rampling who tells him that the diary was written by his dead friend.

Veronica: I don’t have the diary.

Antony: Excuse me.

Veronica: I burned it.

Antony: It belongs to me.  At least I have the right to know what was in it.

Veronica: Legally, yes. Morally, no.

         THE SENSE OF AN ENDING is about how faulty memories and deep misunderstandings can damage a person’s life. The audience goes through the same process of discovery as Antony, thankfully, while he still has time to act on the truth.

         Terry Hunter, Hawaii News Now.    thunter@hawaiinewsnow.com

         

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