Prosecutors: Hold the 'Gingerbread Man' without bail - Hawaii News Now - KGMB and KHNL

Prosecutors: Hold the 'Gingerbread Man' without bail

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  • Career criminal known as 'Gingerbread Man' arrested after standoff

    Career criminal known as 'Gingerbread Man' arrested after standoff

    Friday, February 17 2017 4:40 AM EST2017-02-17 09:40:35 GMT
    (Image: Hawaii News Now)(Image: Hawaii News Now)

    Amery Kahale-Sugimura, also known as "The Gingerbread Man", was arrested after a dramatic standoff in Waianae Thursday evening.  Only Hawaii News Now was there as Honolulu Police Officers from the SWAT team, K-9 Unit, and Crime Reduction Unit arrested him.  Deputies from the U.S. Marshals were also part of the arrest that took more than two hours

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    Amery Kahale-Sugimura, also known as "The Gingerbread Man", was arrested after a dramatic standoff in Waianae Thursday evening.  Only Hawaii News Now was there as Honolulu Police Officers from the SWAT team, K-9 Unit, and Crime Reduction Unit arrested him.  Deputies from the U.S. Marshals were also part of the arrest that took more than two hours

    More >>
HONOLULU (HawaiiNewsNow) -

Prosecutors will ask a judge to hold the man behind an hours-long dramatic standoff in Waianae on Thursday without bail.

Amery Kahale-Sugimura, 38, has 85 priors and 22 convictions.

And his newest arrest has some asking why he was on the streets in the first place.

Kahale-Sugimura has earned the nickname "The Gingerbread Man" because of his propensity for running.

Deputy city Prosecutor Scott Spallina said he was released from jail last month after pleading guilty to multiple felonies.

"The defense attorney said give him a chance, give him a chance at Habilitat, at drug treatment," he said. "So the judge gave him a chance to go to Habilitat."

Spallina says he objected, the judge allowed it.

And Kahale-Sugimura violated the judge's orders almost immediately by leaving the in-patient treatment center.

"He went to Habilitat, in the reception area, and then he walked away," Spallina said. "He sees a friend of his over there and the two of them leave and that was it."

State legislators say the case points to the need for tougher laws regarding repeat offenders. 

"After awhile, it becomes a pattern and at some point it's clear that you've chosen a life of crime," said state Rep. Karl Rhoads.

Hawaii used to have a "three strikes law," imposing stiff penalties for repeat offenders. But it only lasted from 2006 to 2011.  

State Sen. Will Espero said Kahale-Sugimura's past shows the need for something similar.

"We need to re-look at our three strikes law and the issue with repeat offenders," he said.

Espero said he understands the need for judges to have discretion, but added that manhunts like the ones needed to capture Kahale-Sugimura in 2013, 2014, 2015 and Thursday night, are dangerous for police officers and the public and are costly for taxpayers.

Kahale-Sugimura remains in jail on a $1.5 million bail, but Spallina will go to court next week to argue that even that amount isn't enough.

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