Akana dismisses OHA lawsuit against CEO Crabbe - Hawaii News Now - KGMB and KHNL

Akana dismisses OHA lawsuit against CEO Crabbe

Rowena Akana Rowena Akana
HONOLULU (HawaiiNewsNow) -

The former chairwoman of the Office of Hawaiian Affairs has dismissed a case that was filed by her on OHA's behalf, asking a judge to invalidate the contract of the agency's chief executive.

Last Wednesday, Rowena Akana filed a motion asking a judge for injuctive relief, arguing that CEO Kamanao Crabbe's new three-year contract is invalid because it was never approved by the full board. 

The case, which is believed to have been filed without the consent of the board, was not well received by its members, and Akana was ousted from her position as chairwoman of OHA's Board of Trustees the following day.

On Monday, Akana dismissed the case without prejudice. 

Recent OHA board meetings have been subject to infighting, with many of the conflicts a result of internal leadership struggles.

Copyright 2017 Hawaii News Now. All rights reserved. 

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