Lahaina residents rebuilding days after raging river wiped out d - Hawaii News Now - KGMB and KHNL

ADVERTISEMENT
Bookmark and Share

Lahaina residents rebuilding days after raging river wiped out driveway and yard

Driveway to Palakiko's home (image: Hawaii News Now) Driveway to Palakiko's home (image: Hawaii News Now)
Entrance to Palakiko home in Lahaina after massive rockslide (image: Hawaii News Now) Entrance to Palakiko home in Lahaina after massive rockslide (image: Hawaii News Now)
Enormous boulders in front yard (image: Hawaii News Now) Enormous boulders in front yard (image: Hawaii News Now)
Family and friends delivering water (image: Hawaii News Now) Family and friends delivering water (image: Hawaii News Now)
Entrance to Palakiko home (image: Hawaii News Now) Entrance to Palakiko home (image: Hawaii News Now)
LAHAINA, MAUI (HawaiiNewsNow) -

There is a giant crater in the Palakiko family’s yard where major flooding caused a massive rockslide in West Maui Tuesday night.

Two days after the heavy downpours, residents in Kauaula Valley in Lahaina are still assessing the damage.

“It still feels surreal, like a dream. And I just look at the landscape and I don't recognize it because I've never seen it like this before," Mark Palakiko said.

Tuesday's flooding on the Valley Isle overflowed the river next to their home and the raging water wiped out the driveway to four families. Forty-eight hours later, massive boulders are still in their front yard.

"We can say with certainty that this is probably unprecedented in the history of this river for it to have changed its course so dramatically," said Ku'ulei Palakiko.

Luckily, no one was injured and their homes weren't swept away. But aside from not being able to get in or out, they have no running water to drink, bathe in, cook with, or feed their taro patches they rely on every day.

"My main issue right now is that our intake was taken out for our 'auwai, which feeds our taro patches, our lo'i. That is a big concern right now. The patches can go a few days without water but we're gonna have to get water to the plants to patches," Charlie Palakiko said.

For now, families and friends are hand-carrying over water, food, and supplies down of what's left of their driveway, over giant boulders and across a tiny makeshift bridge. But the Palakikos need more to get back to everyday life.

"Of course it's gonna take massive amounts of work, machinery above and beyond the capacity of what we own or what we have access to," said Ku'ulei.

Those who want to reach out to the Palakiko family may email m3ksap@gmail.com.

Copyright 2016 Hawaii News Now. All rights reserved.

Powered by Frankly