'Mo' Monsalve still missing on Maui 2 years after her disappeara - Hawaii News Now - KGMB and KHNL

'Mo' Monsalve still missing on Maui 2 years after her disappearance

Moreira Monsalve with Bernard Brown Moreira Monsalve with Bernard Brown
Moreira “Mo” Monsalve Moreira “Mo” Monsalve
Vigil held to mark the second anniversary of Monsalve's disappearance Vigil held to mark the second anniversary of Monsalve's disappearance
WAILUKU, MAUI (HawaiiNewsNow) -

A crowd gathered for a candlelight vigil in Wailuku Tuesday night to mark the second anniversary of the disappearance of a Maui mother.

Moreira Monsalve was last known to be with her ex-boyfriend, Bernard Brown, who is considered a person of interest in her disappearance.

Over the past two years, two questions have haunted Maui residents: What happened to “Mo” Monsalve and did Brown, who is now living on the mainland, have anything to do with it.

"There’s never a day that I'm not thinking about her. I just wish I could talk to her or even turn back the hands of time and savor that last hug that she gave me or the last time she told me she loved me," said her daughter Alexis Felicilda.  

That day was on a Sunday, January 12th 2014 when Monsalve dropped Felicilda off at the airport. Felicilda said her mom then went to Brown's home in Wailuku and that was the last anyone saw of her. Monsalve's purse and some of her other belongings were later found in a dumpster. Although police call Bernard "a person of interest" in the case, he has not been named a suspect.      

Nevertheless, Felicilda is convinced police are closer than ever to solving the case.

"I know for a fact the case has not gone cold. There are still interviewing people and talking to people even though it's now two years later," she said.

Felicilda is now an advocate for Marsy's Law, a victim's rights movement that began in California in 2008 but is dedicated to the rights of all crime victim's throughout the United States.

"I had no idea that Hawaii was one of the states that didn't have victim’s rights laws,” Felicilda said.  

"So when this happens again, sadly it's going to happen, but at least they'll have a way to know what to do and not just running into a room full of darkness," she said.

Felicilda said although these two years have been full of anxiety, frustration, anger, and of course sadness, she is now hopeful since police appear to be making progress.

"For my mom, I would just tell her how much I love her and that I miss her and that I didn't realize how much I relied on her until she was gone.”

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