Scammers targeting Oahu drivers - Hawaii News Now - KGMB and KHNL

Scammers targeting Oahu drivers

One victim said she fell victim to the scam after a bicyclist hit her car, causing some damage. One victim said she fell victim to the scam after a bicyclist hit her car, causing some damage.
Police say scammers are purposely colliding with cars and demanding cash from their drivers. Police say scammers are purposely colliding with cars and demanding cash from their drivers.
HONOLULU (HawaiiNewsNow) -

Drivers beware!

Authorities say an old scam has resurfaced and is now spreading across Oahu: Bicyclists, pedestrians, or skateboarders are colliding with cars then demanding cash from the drivers.

One recent victim wanted to share her story so other don't fall victim to the scam like she did.

The woman, who didn't want her identity revealed for her safety, said she was driving along Aiea Access Road onto Kamehameha Highway last Thursday when a bicyclist rammed into her car.

"The next thing I knew, he was up against the side of my car. And it was almost like, I thought, did I hit him?" she said. "And I'm thinking but I wasn't moving, how could I have hit him?"

The woman said her side mirror was busted and knocked in, and the body of her car was scratched and dented.

But she was more concerned with the bicyclist, apparently in pain on the ground.

She said the man "popped up, which I thought was a little odd because I thought, we had just collided.

"He popped up and he's shaking his head going, ‘No I'm OK, I'm OK. But no cops, no cops. Don't call the cops.’"

Instead, the man demanded money. After arguing with him, the woman finally gave in and gave the man all the money she had in her wallet: $40.

The woman then went to see Michael Le, owner of Akamai Tinting in Kapolei, whose shop also does auto body repairs.

Le said the woman wasn't the first person he'd seen to fall victim to the scam.

So far, he said, he's seen at least four people who have been victimized.

"Customers come in asking us how much it's gonna be repair the scratch or the dent," he said. "They've all said the same thing, ‘Someone ran into me on their bicycle.'"

Police said the law requires drivers to report accidents whenever anyone is injured. "Drivers should not pay and should call 911 because it will frequently thwart scammers who want a quick buck and don't want to get reported," HPD said in a statement.

HPD said reporting these incidents also allows police to get descriptions and help identify patterns and possible suspects.

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