Thieves steal valuables from sacred Hawaiian fishpond - Hawaii News Now - KGMB and KHNL

Thieves steal valuables from sacred Hawaiian fishpond

workers found locks to their containers cut and shelves toppled over workers found locks to their containers cut and shelves toppled over
Rosalyn Concepcion Rosalyn Concepcion

A non-profit organization in Kaneohe responsible for maintaining a sacred Hawaiian fishpond is now back thousands of dollars.

When workers of Waikalua Loko Fishpond Preservation Society came in Monday morning, they found locks to their containers cut and shelves toppled over. 

Thieves got away with valuable tools and equipment.

"All along here, on all of these poles, we had five weed whackers so those are all gone," said Rosalyn Concepcion, Operations Manager.

“Here, we had six chainsaws. So as you can see, the space is now empty,” Concepcion said.

Concepcion oversees everything that goes on at Waikalua Loko Ia. She says the stolen tools are everything they need for upkeep of the 360-year-old Hawaiian fishpond.

"It makes me mad but it also saddens me because this is a pu'uhonua, this is a very sacred place, and for someone to come in and violate it the way that they have, just gives me mixed feelings," she said.

Concepcion says workers locked the 40-foot container around 4:30 p.m. on Saturday. A police report was filed when they made the discovery around 8:00 a.m. on Monday. She said $4,000 worth of tools and equipment was taken.

Concepcion says $4,000 is a lot of money to their non-profit organization. The stolen tools help maintain the fishpond, control invasive species, and educate Hawaii's children. Students from around the island take field trips there to learn cultural importance of this fishpond.

"There's also some marine science equipment that was taken too…so it impacts the kids more than anything else," said Concepcion.

The Waikalua Loko Fishpond Preservation Society relies entirely on donations from the community and grants that they apply for.

All Concepcion wants is their tools back so they can get back to teaching and preserving this cultural treasure.

The non-profit group is asking community members to keep an eye out for them or for donations. The chainsaws and weed whackers have “WLFPS” labeled on them and are Stihl brand.



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