U.S. FDA Grants 510(k) Clearance To Innovative Device For Easy Medication Administration When Patients Are Unable To Swallow - Hawaii News Now - KGMB and KHNL

U.S. FDA Grants 510(k) Clearance To Innovative Device For Easy Medication Administration When Patients Are Unable To Swallow

  • HealthMore>>

  • People seek out health info when famous person dies

    People seek out health info when famous person dies

    WEDNESDAY, April 23, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The deaths of well-known people offer an opportunity to educate the general public about disease detection and prevention, a new study suggests. Researchers surveyed 1,400 American men and women after Apple co-founder Steve Jobs died of pancreatic cancer in 2011 and learned that more than one-third of them sought information about his cause of death or information about cancer in general soon after his death was reported. About 7 percent of th...More >>
    WEDNESDAY, April 23, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The deaths of well-known people offer an opportunity to educate the general public about disease detection and prevention, a new study suggests. Researchers surveyed 1,400 American men and women after Apple co-founder Steve Jobs died of pancreatic cancer in 2011 and learned that more than one-third of them sought information about his cause of death or information about cancer in general soon after his death was reported. About 7 percent of th...More >>
  • Spouse's sunny outlook may be good for your health

    Spouse's sunny outlook may be good for your health

    Marriage vows often include the promise to stick together for better or for worse, and research now suggests that when it comes to your health, having an optimistic spouse is better.More >>
    Marriage vows often include the promise to stick together for better or for worse, and research now suggests that when it comes to your health, having an optimistic spouse is better.More >>
  • Mental illness not a driving force behind crime

    Mental illness not a driving force behind crime

    TUESDAY, April 22, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Less than 10 percent of crimes committed by mentally ill people are directly linked to the symptoms of their disorders, a new study shows. "When we hear about crimes committed by people with mental illness, they tend to be big headline-making crimes, so they get stuck in people's heads," said study author Jillian Peterson, a psychology professor at Normandale Community College in Bloomington, Minn. "The vast majority of people with mental illness a...More >>
    TUESDAY, April 22, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Less than 10 percent of crimes committed by mentally ill people are directly linked to the symptoms of their disorders, a new study shows. "When we hear about crimes committed by people with mental illness, they tend to be big headline-making crimes, so they get stuck in people's heads," said study author Jillian Peterson, a psychology professor at Normandale Community College in Bloomington, Minn. "The vast majority of people with mental illness a...More >>
  • Latest Health NewsThe Latest from HealthDayMore>>

  • Spouse's sunny outlook may be good for your health

    Spouse's sunny outlook may be good for your health

    Marriage vows often include the promise to stick together for better or for worse, and research now suggests that when it comes to your health, having an optimistic spouse is better.More >>
    Marriage vows often include the promise to stick together for better or for worse, and research now suggests that when it comes to your health, having an optimistic spouse is better.More >>
  • Mental illness not a driving force behind crime

    Mental illness not a driving force behind crime

    TUESDAY, April 22, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Less than 10 percent of crimes committed by mentally ill people are directly linked to the symptoms of their disorders, a new study shows. "When we hear about crimes committed by people with mental illness, they tend to be big headline-making crimes, so they get stuck in people's heads," said study author Jillian Peterson, a psychology professor at Normandale Community College in Bloomington, Minn. "The vast majority of people with mental illness a...More >>
    TUESDAY, April 22, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Less than 10 percent of crimes committed by mentally ill people are directly linked to the symptoms of their disorders, a new study shows. "When we hear about crimes committed by people with mental illness, they tend to be big headline-making crimes, so they get stuck in people's heads," said study author Jillian Peterson, a psychology professor at Normandale Community College in Bloomington, Minn. "The vast majority of people with mental illness a...More >>
  • A little wine might help kidneys stay healthy

    A little wine might help kidneys stay healthy

    An occasional glass of wine might help keep your kidneys healthy, new research suggests.More >>
    An occasional glass of wine might help keep your kidneys healthy, new research suggests.More >>

Information contained on this page is provided by an independent third-party content provider. WorldNow and this Station make no warranties or representations in connection therewith. If you have any questions or comments about this page please contact pressreleases@worldnow.com.

SOURCE Hospi Corporation

Macy Catheter™ is the Only Device Approved in the U.S. Solely for Ongoing Rectal Delivery of Medications and Liquids

Invented by a Nurse to be Easy to Use, Discreet and Comfortable

NEWARK, Calif., Feb. 13, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- Hospi Corporation, a privately-held medical device company focused on nurse invented products that optimize patient care, today announced receipt of 510(k) clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for its first product, the Macy Catheter™.  The Macy Catheter is the only device designed and approved solely for ongoing rectal delivery of medications and liquids.

(Photo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20140213/SF64365)  

Invented by a 20-year veteran hospice nurse, the device offers clinicians and caregivers an easy, discreet and comfortable alternative to rectal administration of medication.  The Macy Catheter is particularly useful for patients with serious or terminal illness who often lose the ability to swallow. 

"Rectal administration is a fast, safe and highly effective route of delivery for many medications, especially those used for management of symptoms at the end of life; however, it is often under-utilized in hospice due to the discomfort and embarrassment associated with suppository administration," said Brad Macy, RN, BSN, CHPN, co-founder of Hospi, inventor of the Macy Catheter, and recipient of 2013's National Hospice and Palliative Care Nurse of the Year Award.  "Speed of symptom control is important when a person may only have a few hours or days to live, and medications administered rectally in suspension or solution form are generally absorbed more quickly than suppositories.  The Macy Catheter transforms rectal delivery of medication by providing a comfortable and discreet way to administer ongoing medications and liquids without repeated invasion of privacy and suppository administration."

He added, "The Macy Catheter is also easy for clinicians and caregivers to use in the home environment, where it can provide peace of mind to those caring for a loved one who may be struggling with pain and other distressing symptoms at end-of-life.  By allowing them to be easily cared for at home, patients can avoid spending their last days at the hospital.  Home is where most patients prefer to be."

Hospi believes the Macy Catheter can enhance hospice and palliative care by decreasing suffering due to pain and other symptoms near the end of life, and by allowing patients to remain in the home setting during their last days. 

The Macy Catheter will be sold by Hospi Corporation and available via prescription as a single use, disposable device starting in Spring 2014.  Once placed by a clinician, it rests on a patient's leg or abdomen where it is easily accessible for repeat administration of liquids and medications.  The Macy Catheter is constructed of Silicone.  It is protected by two issued U.S. patents and has several patents pending. 

Although initially the Macy Catheter may be used primarily to manage symptoms for approximately 1.65 million patients in hospice each year[1], Hospi sees broad applicability for the device whenever a patient has a compromised oral route, such as due to severe nausea and vomiting.  Additional market segments where the Macy Catheter may be relevant include palliative care, home health, skilled nursing, and acute care.

About Hospi Corporation
Hospi Corporation is a privately-held medical device company that improves quality of life by innovating practical, high-impact medical devices that enhance patient comfort and wellbeing, ease caregiver burden, and reduce cost.  The company's patient-centric focus, which is informed by a nursing perspective, guided the development of its first product, the Macy Catheter™.  Hospi Corporation has received Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) grants from the National Science Foundation and National Institutes of Health to support development of its nurse-invented products.  For more information, visit www.hospicorp.com.

[1] NHPCO Hospice Facts and Figures, 2012 Edition, National Hospice & Palliative Care Organization

©2012 PR Newswire. All Rights Reserved.