Foundation for Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Announces Research Grant Winners - Hawaii News Now - KGMB and KHNL

Foundation for Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Announces Research Grant Winners

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SOURCE Foundation for Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

ROSEMONT, Ill., Feb. 11, 2014 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The Foundation for PM&R announces the 2014 winter cycle recipients of research grant awards in the field of physical medicine and rehabilitation

Neil Segal, MD (University of Iowa) will receive the Ossur Prosthetic / Orthotic Research Grant for his study on the effect of arch orthoses on tibial rotation and tibiofemoral contact stress. Symptomatic knee osteoarthritis is one of the most common disabling conditions in the US.  This study will test whether arch-supportive insoles are effective in reducing the risk factors for musculoskeletal disease including knee osteoarthritis.

Prakash Jayabalan, MD (University of Pittsburgh Medical Center) will be awarded the Justus Lehmann Research Grant to study the effect of walking exercise regimens on joint biomechanics and serum biomarker profile in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Recent studies have shown that walking can at least temporarily relieve pain and improve function; this study hopes to determine the most effective walking regimen for maximal benefit.

Tadgh O'Gara, MD (Wake Forest University) will be given the inaugural Aspen Medical Products Spinal Bracing Research Grant to study continuous monitoring of pelvic tilt and its correlation to adolescent idiopathic scoliosis.  This unique study will utilize smart phone technology to monitor sitting posture in adolescents with and without idiopathic scoliosis, and if so, attempt to determine if there is a causative relationship.

These awards will be presented on Saturday, March 1 at the Renaissance Hotel in Nashville, in conjunction with the Association of Academic Physiatrists annual meeting.  Ossur and Aspen Medical Products provide support for their named awards; the winners are selected by an independent review committee.  The Foundation for PM&R gives over $130,000 annually in seed money for pilot projects to help researchers secure funding for outcomes and effectiveness research on PM&R treatments for individuals with disability.  Over 90% of support for the Foundation comes from private individual donations.

About The Foundation for Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation:
Nine out of 10 Americans will suffer functional disability due to illness or injury at some point in their lives.  The Foundation for PM&R is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization which strives to enhance health and function for individuals with disability through research and education in the field of physical medicine and rehabilitation.  For more information, please contact Phyllis Anderson at panderson@foundationforpmr.org or visit the website at www.foundationforpmr.org.

Contact: Jennifer L. Vince, Phone: 312-593-4470, jvince@foundationformpr.org

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