National Eating Disorder Awareness Week Highlights Resources For Treatment And Support - Hawaii News Now - KGMB and KHNL

National Eating Disorder Awareness Week Highlights Resources For Treatment And Support

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SOURCE Overeaters Anonymous World Service Office

RIO RANCHO, N.M., Jan. 30, 2014 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Eating disorders are serious, sometimes life-threatening illnesses that affect millions of men and women every year in the United States and throughout the world. These disorders are not a lifestyle choice and, according to the National Institute of Mental Health, often coexist with other illnesses such as depression, substance abuse or anxiety disorders. Increasing awareness of the illness and providing support to individuals who suffer from eating disorders helps make long-term recovery possible.

(Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20130305/DC71336LOGO)

National Eating Disorders Awareness Week is February 23March 1, 2014. Overeaters Anonymous (OA) encourages those who suffer from a range of eating disorders to take the first step and reach out for help. OA's 12-step program offers much-needed structure and support for members who suffer from anorexia, bulimia, and compulsive overeating. OA encourages its members to learn about their destructive food behavior patterns and go beyond them, experiencing  inner change and physical, emotional and spiritual recovery through the Twelve Steps.  Many members find that as old attitudes are discarded there is no longer a need for compulsive eating. OA also encourages its members to learn about their nutritional needs and seek professional advice if needed.

For more information or to be put in contact with an OA representative, please call Tina Carroll at (636) 328-0216 or email her at media@oa.org.

About Overeaters Anonymous: Overeaters Anonymous, Inc. (OA), is a non-profit organization with the goal of supporting its members as they seek recovery from compulsive eating behaviors. OA welcomes anyone with an eating disorder ranging from anorexia to binge-eating at any of its more than 6,500 OA group meetings worldwide. Through its worldwide fellowship, OA has found a solution to the problems arising from overeating. Over fifty years after its founding, today OA serves over 60,000 members in nearly 80 countries. For more information, go to www.oa.org.

Contact: Tina Carroll, (636)328-0216, media@oa.org

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