The Capital Region's First Ride To Conquer Cancer Launches To Raise Vital Funds For Cancer Programs At Johns Hopkins Medicine - Hawaii News Now - KGMB and KHNL

The Capital Region's First Ride To Conquer Cancer Launches To Raise Vital Funds For Cancer Programs At Johns Hopkins Medicine

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SOURCE Ride to Conquer Cancer

Funds raised through the 150 mile cycling event will power a joint effort to identify discoveries, treatments and screening interventions for cancer patients at Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center, Sibley Memorial and Suburban Hospitals.

WASHINGTON, Jan. 30, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- The Capital Region's first annual Ride to Conquer Cancer launched on Thursday to raise vital funds for cancer programs at Johns Hopkins Medicine.  Funds raised through the 2 day, 150 mile cycling event will power a joint effort by researchers and doctors at Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center, Sibley Memorial and Suburban Hospitals to support scientific discoveries that determine which cancer treatments and screening interventions will work best for individuals and cancer patients.

"We are absolutely thrilled to announce our first annual Ride to Conquer Cancer benefiting Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center, Sibley Memorial and Suburban Hospitals," said Dr. William Nelson, Director, Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center.

"This year alone it's estimated that one in four deaths in the United States will be caused by cancer.  At Johns Hopkins Medicine we are on a mission to improve the health of the community and the world by setting the standard of excellence in medical education, research and clinical care.  The vital funds we hope to raise through The Ride will be put to use immediately enabling our world-leading researchers and doctors at Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center, Sibley Memorial and Suburban Hospitals to advance their efforts to make breakthrough discoveries which enable more precise cancer treatments and screening interventions for individuals who have yet to be diagnosed with cancer, as well as those with cancer," said Dr. Nelson.

The Ride to Conquer Cancer will be a two-day, 150 mile cycling event through the Capital Region's picturesque countryside with an overnight camp midway where participants will enjoy pre-set tents, hot meals, showers, live entertainment, massages and other festive activities.  The Ride start and finish will be held on September 13th and 14th of this year, and pit stops with fresh food, beverages and public cheer stations will be set up along the route to support Riders as they pass through local communities.

"While my wife was fighting breast cancer this past year, the strength she showed was an inspiration to me, our family and friends," said Andrew Blysak, from Herndon, VA who is registered for the Ride.

"We are just so grateful for the support our family received during a very difficult time and I cannot think of a better way to close out this journey than to help fund research that will save someone else, and of course to celebrate my wife being cancer free.  My initial goal was to raise $2,500, and after just one round of emails, I surpassed that.  I've since raised my goal to $10,000 and I have no doubt that I'll be able to reach it," Blysak added.

Dr. Nelson said The Ride is a cycling event for everyone to do at their own pace, and urged people in the Capital Region to register, donate or request information by calling (855) 822-7433 or by visiting www.ridetovictory.org

"The Ride will bring together incredible communities of cancer survivors, cyclists and their supporters with a common purpose, goal to conquer cancer," said Dr. Nelson.  "We hope everyone will join us in September by registering today at www.ridetovictory.org or by calling (855) 822-7433," Dr. Nelson added.

To register, donate or request information about The Ride to Conquer Cancer, visit www.ridetovictory.org or call (855) 822-7433.

ABOUT JOHNS HOPKINS MEDICINE: Visit www.hopkinscancer.org

MEDIA CONTACT:
Ailish Steele, Senior Communications Manager, The Ride To Conquer Cancer
Mobile: (855) 287-3953, Email: asteele@ridetovictory.org

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