Local Connection: Hawaiʻi Pacific University - Hawaii News Now - KGMB and KHNL

Local Connection: Hawaiʻi Pacific University

As 2013 draws to a close, a new era is about to begin for Hawaiʻi Pacific University.  2014 will see renovations start at Aloha Tower Marketplace that will not only create residential lofts for 300 students, but a vibrant retail and dining atmosphere and community gathering spaces. 

In 2014, we will also welcome the Oceanic Institute into the HPU Ohana. This pioneering aquaculture center is helping countries worldwide develop sustainable food systems as well as restoring traditional fishing ponds here at home. The institute will launch a new effort next year to create sustainable feed operations on the Big Island for local agriculture, helping our state to meet more of our own food needs.

HPU's development certainly benefits our 7,000 students. But we hope it benefits Hawaiʻi just as much. We are building an ever-stronger university with complementary strengths to those of our friends at the University of Hawaiʻi. And we're graduating students prepared to meet our state's biggest challenges.

Visit us online or at one of our three Oahu locations and see why HPU doesn't just represent a great education, but a great adventure. Mahalo!

Copyright 2013 Hawaii News Now. All rights reserved 

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